Texas

Technical Assistance:

Montgomery County, Texas Sex Offender Compliance Team (July 2005): CSOM provided support to enable a six-person team to attend the CSOM training at the 2006 Winter APPA Training Institute.

Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Parole Division (September 2002): Three CSOM staff members and two consultants conducted a site visit in an effort to assist the Parole Division in understanding how to improve their management of sex offenders under parole supervision.

Wichita County, Texas (December 1999): Conducted a site visit to assist in the establishment of a collaborative juvenile sex offender management team.

Texas Department of Criminal Justice Programs and Services Division (September 1999): Provided a consultant to meet with representatives of the Division at the 1999 ATSA Conference in Orlando, FL to consult on the selection of a risk assessment instrument, followed by a site visit in December 1999 to work with a legislatively appointed committee charged with selecting and implementing an instrument for state use by January 2000.

Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Parole Division (August 1999): CSOM provided support to enable five agency planning team members to attend the CSOM training at the 1999 Summer APPA Training Institute.

Training:

Judicial Education Training (April 2008): Center staff delivered a one-day training event based on the comprehensive training curriculum for juvenile and family court judges on juvenile sex offender issues developed under a grant from the State Justice Institute. Developed and delivered by distinguished members of the judiciary and experts in the field of juvenile sex offender management, this model judicial education curriculum provides juvenile and family court judges a unique opportunity to gain practical and vital information that can enhance day-to-day decisionmaking in these cases. The curriculum was designed to promote open exchange and discussion between participants and the faculty regarding common challenges and creative solutions.
Funder: State Justice Institute

Provided a consultant to conduct a one day workshop on national best practices in sex offender management and sex offender risk assessment to a multi-disciplinary audience in Fort Worth, Texas, September 2007 (100 participants).

Conducted a training on key juvenile sex offender management issues at the Texas Judicial Education Conference tailored to an audience of juvenile and family court judges in Horseshoe Bay, Texas, February 2006 (75 participants).

Conducted a training on key juvenile sex offender management issues at the Texas Judicial Education Conference tailored to an audience of juvenile and family court judges in San Antonio, Texas, January 2006 (75 participants).

Conducted a half-day pre-conference session on the J-SOAP-II (for juvenile sex offender assessment) tool to 97 participants and a statewide training designed to assist key stakeholders to enhance their approaches to juvenile sex offender management. At the statewide training, CSOM staff provided a national and Texas-specific perspective on the incidence and prevalence of sexual victimization perpetrated by these youth, emphasizing the importance of victim-centeredness in offender management, current research and emerging practices, critical components of a comprehensive and effective approach to managing these juveniles, state and national resources to support jurisdictions' efforts to manage these juveniles more effectively, potential impact of job stress and secondary trauma associated with these cases. Through the training, staff offered participants an opportunity to discuss the challenges they face in this work and assist them with the consideration, translation, and practical application of the information provided to a multidisciplinary audience consisting primarily of supervision and treatment providers, but also judges, prosecutors, victim advocates, and law enforcement personnel in Irving, Texas, June 2005 (405 participants).

Delivered a two-day training on sex offender management issues and practices, including the incidence and prevalence of sexual victimization, its impact on victims, and the importance of victim-centeredness; current research and knowledge about sex offenders and the associated implications for effective risk management; key elements of specialized assessment, treatment, and community supervision of sex offenders; and critical components of an effective approach to transitioning sex offenders from prisons to the community to Members, Commissioners, and staff from the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles, and key administrators from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice’s Institutional, Parole, and Victim Services Divisions in Huntsville, Texas, December 2004 (45 participants).

Conducted a one-day training on juvenile sex offender management at the request of the Tarrant County, Texas Sexual Abuse Advisory Council (TCSAAC) in Fort Worth, Texas, August 2004 (300 participants).

Delivered a three-day training on the effective management of sex offenders in the community at the request of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Parole Division to parole division staff, including line officers, unit supervisors, division administrators, community and institutional treatment providers, polygraph examiners, parole board members and commissioners, and victim advocates in Houston, TX, April 2004 (270 participants).

Delivered a three-day training on the effective management of sex offenders in the community at the request of the Texas Department of Criminal Justice, Parole Division to parole division staff, including line officers, unit supervisors, division administrators, community and institutional treatment providers, polygraph examiners, parole board members and commissioners, and victim advocates in Dallas, TX, April 2004 (270 participants).

Provided a consultant to conduct a one day training on juvenile sex offender assessment at the Texas Council for Sex Offender Treatment's annual conference to treatment providers and supervision representatives, July 2002 (375 participants).

Provided a consultant to deliver a training session on juvenile sex offender treatment and secondary trauma during a statewide training event for the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission, January 2002 (100 participants).

Provided a consultant to conduct a training session on the family reintegration of juvenile sex offenders at the 10th Annual Supervision and Treatment of Juvenile Sexual Offenders Conference in Austin, Texas, July 2001 (75 participants).

Provided a county-wide training for judges, probation and parole representatives, treatment providers, victim advocates, and polygraph examiners in Houston, Texas, September 1999 (100 participants).

Resource Site:

Tarrant County established a council in 1981, which has implemented multidisciplinary sex offender units in several criminal justice agencies; established a children's advocacy program; developed treatment guidelines for perpetrators and victims of sexual assault; and have consistently promoted collaborative relationships among those responsible for the community management of sex offenders. Tarrant County also operates a "chaperone" program as part of their approach to sex offender management. Through this program, sex offenders identify significant others who agree to chaperone sex offenders while in public places. Chaperones are taught extensively about the dynamics of sex offending behavior, and are trained to recognize and respond to the signs of relapse behavior.

OJP Grant Sites:

2006: Bexar County (San Antonio) Texas is an urban community of 1,392,931 residents. The census indicates that 36% qualify as low income. BCJP will use the requested 24-month CASOM grant to improve Bexar County's juvenile sex offender management policies and practices by: critically examining existing approaches; identifying gaps and areas of need; and developing and implementing specific corresponding strategies. The resulting approach will be driven by the principles of effective juvenile sex offender management, including: prioritization of and sensitivity to victim impact; utilization of specialized knowledge; education and involvement of the public; assurance of integrity through on-going monitoring and evaluation; and multidisciplinary collaboration.

2003: Dallas County, Texas is an urban jurisdiction with a 2003 estimated population of 2,284,096. In 2002, 155 assessments were conducted on sexually abusive youth referred to the county's juvenile court for a felony sex offense. Approximately 100 juveniles who have committed sex offenses participate in weekly outpatient group treatment and about 35-50 are in residential treatment facilities. The Dallas County Juvenile Department and other agencies and disciplines in the county recognize the need to protect victims while improving their responses and services to youth who commit sex offenses. To address this need, Dallas County received a grant to develop a program that promotes a coordinated effort between the juvenile justice system, and treatment and other service providers to manage these youth more effectively in the community. The Dallas County Juvenile Sex Offender Advisory Board—a multidisciplinary collaborative policy team—began working together in late 2003 to become more of an expert on this issue, examine closely and evaluate their county's existing policies and practices, identify their strengths and gaps in services, prioritize their most significant need areas, and develop strategies to address these. The board has organized itself into four subcommittees to examine and evaluate the county's existing juvenile sex offender management polices and practices in the following areas: investigation, prosecution, and disposition; assessment and treatment; reentry and supervision; and registration and community notification. The results of this evaluation will be used by the board to prioritize their gaps and needs, and develop a plan to address them.

2001: Kerr-Gillespie-Kendall-Bandera Counties, Texas were awarded a planning grant for their multi-county initiative. In 2001, the total population of the four counties totaled 105,875 and the counties cover a total expanse of 3,940 square miles. The counties sought to build a community-based approach for the identification, supervision, and treatment of juvenile and adult sex offenders. They established procedures for processing adult and juvenile sex offenders and treating these offenders, and gathered data about the sex offender population in the counties. The counties also established a formal working relationship between supervision agencies, treatment providers, and the victim advocacy community regarding the effective management of sex offenders in the community.

2001: Lamar County, Texas is a rural county located in northeast Texas with a 2001 population of approximately 48,500. Sex offenses in Lamar County have risen in recent years. The county's existing Sexual Trauma Advisory Review Council (STAR) brought together a multidisciplinary group of practitioners to address areas in which the county might improve its sex offender management system and the group is committed to continuing their collaborative efforts to work toward community safety by implementing more enhanced supervision practices, increased collaboration between agencies, and additional treatment interventions for sex offenders.

2000: In 2000, the state of Texas, with a population of approximately 19,274,300, had jurisdiction over 15 percent of sex offenders estimated to be under correctional supervision in the United States. The Texas Department of Criminal Justice created a Sex Offender Multidisciplinary Team to implement a work plan to ensure continuity of supervision and treatment for sex offenders. Funds from an implementation/enhancement grant were used to initiate the implementation of statewide treatment and community supervision standards, refine the transition of sex offenders from institution to community, and educate key stakeholders about effective sex offender management practices (including the judiciary, prosecutors, treatment providers, victim advocates, and the community).

1999: Harris County, Texas, is the third largest urban area in the United States with an estimated population of 3,126,966 in 1999. The county supervises approximately 1,500 adult sex offenders in the community; 80 percent of these offenders have victimized children. An implementation/enhancement grant assisted the Community Supervision and Corrections Department's Sex Offender Unit in developing a program designed to screen, educate, and evaluate adults providing supervision during sex offenders' contacts with minors. The program is intended for offenders who have had victims under the age of 14 and are allowed by the courts to have supervised contact with minors during the term of their pre-trial and/or community supervision sentences.