Questions: Adult Cases

Specialized Information

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do judges in the criminal courts participate in specialized judicial education programs pertaining to adult sex offense cases?
  2. Are training opportunities about sex offender management specifically tailored to the meet the unique needs of judges?
  3. Do judicial education programs address the following:
    • Current data about sexual victimization trends, including the nature of the relationship between many victims and offenders, the underreporting of sexual victimization, and the impact of sex crimes on victims?
    • The heterogeneity of the sex offender population, and the associated implications for management strategies?
    • Differences between adults and juveniles who have committed sex offenses?
    • Recidivism data, including variations in recidivism rates?
    • Risk factors that are associated with recidivism among adult and juvenile sex offenders?
    • The importance of assessment–driven decisionmaking, including the types of assessments that can be most useful for judges?
    • The strengths and limitations of risk assessment methods, including specific tools designed for adult and juvenile sex offenders?
    • Research–supported and promising management strategies for these populations?
    • The multiple roles that judges can play in promoting effective sex offender management?
  4. Do policies or procedures require that a pre–sentence investigation is completed for all sex offenders as a means of informing sentencing/disposition decisions?
  5. In practice, do judges order pre–sentence investigations as a means of informing sentencing/disposition decisions?
  6. Are pre–sentence investigations of sufficient quality to be informative for judges?
  7. Are pre–sentence investigations delivered to the court in a timely manner?
  8. Do policies or procedures require that a specialized psychosexual evaluation is conducted for all sex offenders as a means of informing sentencing/disposition decisions?
  9. In practice, do judges order psychosexual evaluations prior to sentencing/disposition as a means of informing sentencing/disposition decisions?
  10. Are psychosexual evaluations of sufficient quality to be informative for judges?
  11. Are psychosexual evaluations delivered to the court in a timely manner?
  12. Are the results of sex offender–specific risk assessments used to inform sentencing/disposition decisions?
  13. Do policies or procedures afford judges discretion in the disposition/sentencing phase to allow for informed decisions based on sex offenders’ risk and needs?
  14. In practice, do judges use discretion during the disposition/sentencing phase to make informed decisions based on sex offenders’ risk and needs?

Judicial Support for Effective Management Strategies

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Is support for effective sex offender management strategies demonstrated tangibly by judges through the following:
    • Promoting victim–centeredness throughout the court process?
    • Handing down well–informed and assessment–driven dispositions that include evidence–based and promising management strategies?
    • Reinforcing offender progress and compliance, as well as imposing appropriate sanctions for offender non–compliance?
    • Demanding accountability from the stakeholders responsible for offender management?
    • Becoming familiar with local resources for victims and offenders, including capacity and costs?
    • Assisting with capacity–building efforts when critical gaps are identified?
    • Supporting multidisciplinary training events about sex offender management as both an educator and a participant?
    • Representing the courts as an active team member on collaborative initiatives?
    • Educating policymakers as a means of promoting evidence–based legislation?

Questions: Juvenile Cases

Specialized Information

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do juvenile/family court judges participate in specialized judicial education programs pertaining to juvenile sex offense cases?
  2. Are training opportunities about juvenile sex offender management specifically tailored to the meet the unique needs of judges?
  3. Do judicial education programs for juvenile/family court judges address the following:
    • Current information about sexual victimization trends?
    • The needs and interests of victims?
    • The heterogeneity of juveniles who commit sex offenses?
    • Differences between adults and juveniles who have committed sex offenses?
    • Adolescent development, as it relates to considering juvenile sex offense cases?
    • Contemporary information about juvenile sex offender recidivism, including the unique risk factors for juvenile sex offenders?
    • The importance of assessment–driven decisionmaking?
    • Strengths and limitations of risk assessment methods, including tools designed specifically for juvenile sex offenders?
    • Research–supported and promising management strategies for juvenile sex offenders?
    • The multiple roles that juvenile/family court judges can play in promoting effective juvenile sex offender management?
  4. Do policies or procedures require that a pre–disposition report is completed for all juvenile sex offenders as a means of informing disposition decisions?
  5. In practice, do juvenile/family court judges order pre–disposition reports as a means of informing disposition decisions?
  6. Are pre–disposition reports of sufficient quality to be informative for juvenile/family court judges?
  7. Are pre–disposition reports delivered to the juvenile/family court in a timely manner?
  8. Do policies or procedures require that a specialized psychosexual evaluation is conducted for all juvenile sex offenders as a means of informing disposition decisions?
  9. In practice, do juvenile/family court judges order psychosexual evaluations as a means of informing disposition decisions?
  10. Are psychosexual evaluations of sufficient quality to be informative for juvenile/family court judges?
  11. Are psychosexual evaluations delivered to the juvenile/family court in a timely manner?
  12. Are the results of juvenile sex offender–specific risk assessments used to inform disposition decisions?
  13. Do juvenile/family court judges order assessments of parents/caregivers as a means of informing disposition decisions?
  14. Do statutes, policies, or guidelines afford juvenile/family court judges discretion in the disposition phase to allow for informed decisions based on juvenile sex offenders’ risk and needs (and the needs of their families)?
  15. In practice, do juvenile/family court judges use discretion during the disposition phase to make informed decisions based on juvenile sex offenders’ risk and needs (and the needs of their families)?

Judicial Support for Effective Management Strategies

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Is support for effective juvenile sex offender management strategies demonstrated tangibly by juvenile/family court judges through the following:
    • Promoting victim–centeredness throughout the court process?
    • Handing down well–informed and assessment–driven dispositions that include evidence–based and promising management strategies for juveniles and their families?
    • Using the leverage of the courts to enlist the support or involvement of parents/caregivers?
    • Reinforcing progress and compliance, as well as imposing appropriate sanctions for non–compliance?
    • Demanding accountability from the stakeholders responsible for juvenile offender management?
    • Becoming familiar with local resources for victims, juvenile sex offenders, and their families (including capacity and costs)?
    • Assisting with capacity–building efforts when critical gaps are identified?
    • Supporting multidisciplinary training events about juvenile sex offender management as both an educator and a participant?
    • Representing the juvenile/family courts as an active team member on collaborative initiatives?
    • Educating policymakers as a means of promoting evidence–based legislation?