Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Pre–Sentence Investigations (PSI)

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require the completion of a pre–sentence investigation (PSI) assessment report for every sex offender?
  2. Do policies or procedures provide specific guidance about PSI assessment reports involving sex offenders (e.g., when they are to be conducted, what information must be included, format for the report)?
  3. In practice, are PSI assessment reports completed for sex offenders who come to the court’s attention?
  4. Do the individuals responsible for conducting PSI assessment reports (e.g., community supervision officers, court officials) receive specialized training about sex offenders and sex offender management?
  5. Are validated, sex offender–specific actuarial risk assessment tools used as part of the PSI assessment process?
    Which tools are used?
  6. Is a wide range of records (e.g., police reports, victim statements, prior arrest/court involvement, medical/mental health records) carefully reviewed to collect and verify information for the PSI?
  7. Is information from collateral contacts (e.g., family members, partners) incorporated into PSI reports?
  8. Do PSI reports address the following:
    • Instant offense summary, including the offender’s version of the offense(s) and victim impact statements?
    • Prior criminal record, history of delinquency, or referrals to child protection agencies?
    • Social history, including peer relationships and associates?
    • Family, marital, and other social supports?
    • Medical and mental health needs?
    • Substance use/abuse?
    • Employment and/or military history?
    • Financial stability?
    • Residential stability?
    • Estimated recidivism risk, both sexual and non–sexual?
    • Strengths and assets?
    • Findings from the psychosexual evaluation (when available)?
    • Potential conditions of supervision, should the individual be placed in the community?
    • Mitigating or aggravating circumstances that should be taken into account?
  9. Are victim impact statements—either formal statements or documentation of interviews with victims—included in PSI reports?
  10. Are recommendations offered to the court supported by assessment information that is outlined in the body of the PSI report?
  11. If offenders are sentenced to incarceration, do PSI reports become part of their records to ensure availability to intake/classification staff upon transfer to the institution?
  12. If offenders are sentenced to community supervision, do PSI reports become part of their records to ensure availability to assigned community supervision officers?
  13. When offenders are sentenced to community supervision, are PSI reports available to community–based treatment providers to inform treatment planning?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Pre–Disposition Reports

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require the completion of a pre–disposition report for juvenile sex offenders?
  2. Do policies or procedures provide specific guidance about pre–disposition reports involving juvenile sex offenders (e.g., when they are to be conducted, what information must be included, format for the report)?
  3. In practice, are pre–disposition reports completed for juvenile sex offenders who come to the court’s attention?
  4. Do the individuals responsible for conducting pre–disposition reports (e.g., juvenile probation officers, social services case managers) receive specialized training about juvenile sex offenders and juvenile sex offender management?
  5. Are empirically–guided juvenile sex offender–specific risk assessment tools used as part of the pre–disposition assessment process?
    Which tools are used?
  6. Is a wide range of records (e.g., police reports, victim statements, school records, child welfare/social services, medical/mental health records) carefully reviewed to collect and verify information for the pre–disposition report?
  7. Is information from collateral contacts (e.g., parents or guardians, other family members, child protection professionals, school officials) incorporated into pre–disposition reports?
  8. Do pre–disposition reports address the following:
    • Instant offense summary, including the offender’s version of the offense(s) and victim impact statements?
    • History of delinquency?
    • Referrals to child protection agencies/maltreatment history?
    • Social history, including peer relationships and associates?
    • Family and other social supports?
    • Medical and mental health needs?
    • Substance use/abuse?
    • Employment?
    • School performance and conduct?
    • Stability in placement?
    • Estimated recidivism risk, both sexual and non–sexual?
    • Individual and family strengths and assets?
    • Findings from the psychosexual evaluation (when available)?
    • Potential conditions of supervision, should the individual be placed in the community?
    • Expectations for parents/guardians?
    • Mitigating or aggravating circumstances that should be taken into account?
    • Recommendations for placement options, including the least restrictive alternatives?
    • Proximity to home/community when out of home placement is required?
  9. Are victim impact statements—either formal statements or documentation of interviews with victims or their families—included in pre–disposition reports?
  10. Do the pre–disposition reports include recommendations for the least restrictive placement option that ensures community safety?
  11. Do placement recommendations take into account proximity to youths’ homes and communities?
  12. Are recommendations offered to the juvenile/family court supported by assessment information that is outlined in the body of the pre–disposition report?
  13. If juvenile sex offenders are placed in a residential setting or juvenile justice facility, do pre–disposition reports become part of their records to ensure availability to intake/classification staff upon transfer to the facility?
  14. If juvenile sex offenders are placed under community supervision, do predisposition reports become part of their records to ensure availability to the assigned probation or supervision officers?
  15. When juvenile sex offenders are placed under community supervision, are pre–disposition reports available to community–based treatment providers to inform treatment planning?