Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Intake Assessment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do agency policies or procedures require that intake assessments are conducted for offenders entering correctional institutions?
  2. Do agency policies or procedures provide specific guidance about intake assessments (e.g., timeframes, what information must be included, format for the report)?
  3. In practice, do sex offenders undergo an intake assessment upon entry, or shortly after entry, into correctional facilities?
  4. As a part of the intake assessment process, are efforts made to identify offenders who may be particularly vulnerable to harassment or abuse within the institution (in order to inform housing/unit assignments)?
  5. If not part of offenders’ records at the point of arrival, do policies or procedures require that efforts are made to obtain PSI reports for intake purposes?
  6. In practice, if pre–sentence investigations were conducted, is the information contained in the PSI reports used to inform intake assessments?
  7. If not part of offenders’ records at the point of arrival, do policies or procedures require that efforts are made to obtain previously conducted psychosexual evaluations for intake purposes?
  8. In practice, if psychosexual evaluations were conducted, is the information contained in these evaluations used to inform intake assessments?
  9. Does the intake assessment process include screenings or other tools to identify the following:
    • Sex offense–specific treatment needs?
    • Substance use/abuse treatment needs?
    • Medical and mental health needs?
    • Suicide potential?
    • Potential for aggression or harm to others?
    • Educational and vocational needs?
    • Intellectual functioning?
    • Anticipated needs that may impact community reentry?
    • Strengths and assets?
  10. Are validated assessment instruments (e.g., LS/CMI) used to identify “general” intervention needs during the intake process?
    Which tool(s) are used?
  11. Are empirically–supported assessment instruments (e.g., Sex Offender Treatment Needs and Progress Scale) used to identify sex offense–specific intervention needs during the intake process?
    Which tool(s) are used?
  12. Are validated, sex offender–specific risk assessments (e.g., RRASOR, STATIC–99) used as part of the intake assessment process for triaging sex offenders into treatment based on level of risk?
  13. During intake assessments, are responsivity factors (e.g., motivation, cognitive functioning) assessed in order to guide appropriate intervention strategies?
  14. When multiple intervention needs are identified through the intake assessment process, are recommendations offered for the timing or sequencing of interventions?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Intake Assessments

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do agency/facility policies or procedures require that intake assessments are conducted for youth entering residential or juvenile correctional facilities?
  2. Do agency/facility policies or procedures provide specific guidanceabout intake assessments (e.g., timeframes, what information must beincluded, format for the report)?
  3. In practice, do juvenile sex offenders undergo an intake assessment upon entry, or shortly after entry, into residential or juvenile correctional facilities?
  4. As a part of the intake assessment process, are efforts made to identify youth who may be particularly vulnerable to harassment or abuse within the facility (in order to inform rooming or unit assignments)?
  5. If not part of youths’ records upon arrival, do policies or procedures require that efforts are made to obtain pre–disposition reports for intake purposes?
  6. In practice, if pre–disposition reports were conducted, is the information contained in the reports used to inform intake assessments?
  7. If not part of youths’ records upon arrival, do policies or procedures require that efforts are made to obtain psychosexual evaluations for intake purposes?
  8. In practice, if psychosexual evaluations were conducted, is the information contained in these evaluations used to inform intake assessments?
  9. Does the intake assessment process with youth include screenings or other tools to identify the following:
    • Juvenile sex offense–specific treatment needs?
    • Substance use/abuse treatment needs?
    • Medical and mental health needs?
    • Suicide potential?
    • Potential for aggression or harm to others
    • Educational and vocational needs?
    • Intellectual functioning?
    • Anticipated needs that may impact community reentry?
    • Strengths and assets?
  10. Are validated assessment instruments (e.g., YLS/CMI, MAYSI–2) used to identify youths’ intervention needs during the intake process?
    Which tool(s) are used?
  11. Are empirically–supported, juvenile–specific assessment instruments (e.g., ERASOR, J–SOAP–II) used to identify youths’ sex offense–specific intervention needs during the intake process?
    Which tool(s) are used?
  12. Are empirically–supported, juvenile–specific risk assessments (e.g., ERA SOR, J–SOAP–II) used as part of the intake assessment process to inform case management decisions, such as matching intensity of services to level of risk?
  13. During intake assessments, are responsivity factors (e.g., motivation, cognitive functioning) assessed in order to guide appropriate intervention strategies?
  14. When multiple intervention needs are identified through the intake assessment process, are recommendations offered for the timing or sequencing of interventions?
  15. Are parents or caregivers included during the intake assessment process?