Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Psychosexual Evaluations

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require that psychosexual evaluations are conducted for sex offenders?
  2. In practice, are psychosexual evaluations conducted for sex offenders?
  3. Do policies or procedures provide guidance about minimum requirements for psychosexual evaluations (e.g., evaluator qualifications, timing, information to be included, instruments to be used)?
  4. In practice, are the completion and use of psychosexual evaluations limited to the post–conviction, pre–sentencing phase?
  5. In practice, are psychosexual evaluations conducted by qualified clinicians with specialized training and experience in sex offender management?
  6. Do policies or procedures allow for critical information–sharing across agencies or disciplines to ensure that comprehensive data from multiple sources can be accessed for psychosexual evaluations?
  7. In practice, is critical information shared across agencies and disciplines to ensure that comprehensive assessment data from multiple sources can be incorporated into psychosexual evaluations?
  8. Are validated, sex offender–specific risk assessment tools (e.g., RRASOR, STATIC–99) included as a component of psychosexual evaluations?
  9. Are empirically–supported, sex offender–specific tools (e.g., Sex Offender Treatment Needs and Progress Scale) used during the psychosexual evaluation process in order to identify critical dynamic risk factors and targets of treatment?
  10. Do evaluators use specialized interviewing strategies (e.g., Motivational Interviewing) as a means of engaging sex offenders in the assessment process?
  11. Do psychosexual evaluations include the following:
    • Informed consent?
    • Clinical interviews with offender?
    • Interviews with collaterals?
    • Review of documents specific to the offense (e.g., police reports, victim impact statements)?
    • Review of relevant historical records (e.g., prior legal involvement)?
    • Social history?
    • Mental health/health care needs?
    • Detailed sexual history?
    • Level of psychosexual disturbance, including paraphilias?
    • Overall level of functioning?
    • Estimated level of risk (sexual and non–sexual)?
    • Criminogenic needs or dynamic factors to be targeted through treatment and supervision efforts?
    • Responsivity factors that may impact engagement in and response to treatment and supervision interventions?
    • Individual strengths and assets?
    • Recommended intensity of treatment interventions and level of care/placement required?
    • Amenability to treatment and supervision, including prior experiences and outcomes?
  12. Are the results of psychosexual evaluations shared with key stakeholders who are involved in the management process (e.g., correctional case workers, community supervision officers) to inform case management decisions?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Psychosexual Evaluations

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require that psychosexual evaluations are conducted for juvenile sex offenders?
  2. In practice, are psychosexual evaluations conducted for juvenile sex offenders?
  3. Do policies or procedures provide guidance about minimum requirements for psychosexual evaluations (e.g., evaluator qualifications, timing, information to be included, instruments to be used)?
  4. In practice, are the completion and use of psychosexual evaluations limited to the post–adjudication, pre–disposition phase?
  5. In practice, are psychosexual evaluations conducted by qualified clinicians with specialized training and experience in adolescent development and juvenile sex offender management?
  6. Do policies or procedures allow for critical information–sharing across agencies or disciplines to ensure that comprehensive data from multiple sources can be accessed for psychosexual evaluations?
  7. In practice, is critical information shared across agencies and disciplines to ensure that comprehensive assessment data from multiple sources can be incorporated into psychosexual evaluations?
  8. Are empirically–supported, juvenile–specific risk assessment tools (e.g., ERASOR, J–SOAP–II) included as a component of psychosexual evaluations to identify youths’ risk and needs?
  9. Are developmentally–sensitive measures used to identify other intervention needs when conducting psychosexual evaluations of youth?
  10. Do evaluators use specialized interviewing strategies (e.g., Motivational Interviewing) as a means of engaging youth in the assessment process?
  11. Do psychosexual or sex offender–specific evaluations include the following:
    • Informed consent of the youth and parent(s)/guardian(s)?
    • Clinical interviews with youth?
    • Interviews with parent(s)/guardian(s)?
    • Review of documents specific to the offense (e.g., police reports, victim impact statements)?
    • Review of relevant historical records (e.g., prior legal involvement, school)?
    • Social history, including peer relationships?
    • School performance and conduct?
    • Parent–child relationships?
    • Detailed sexual history?
    • Cognitive development and maturity?
    • Estimated level of risk (sexual and non–sexual)?
    • Criminogenic needs or dynamic factors to be targeted through treatment and supervision efforts?
    • Responsivity factors that may impact engagement in and response to treatment and supervision interventions?
    • Individual strengths and assets?
    • Family needs, strengths, and assets?
    • Recommended intensity of treatment interventions and level of care/placement required?
    • Amenability to treatment and supervision, including prior experiences and outcomes?
  12. Are the results of psychosexual evaluations shared with key stakeholders who are involved in the management process (e.g., case managers, family therapists, supervision officers) to inform case management decisions with youth?