Questions: Adult Offenders

Physiological Assessments of Sexual Arousal, Interests, and Preferences

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures address the use of physiological assessments of arousal, interests, and preferences as part of an overall assessment strategy with sex offenders?
  2. In practice, are physiological assessments of sexual arousal, interests, and preferences used as part of an overall assessment strategy?
  3. If physiological assessments of sexual arousal, interests, and preferences are conducted, are the following procedures utilized:
    • Penile plethysmograph?
    • Viewing time?
    • Polygraph (as an indirect measure through sexual history)?
  4. Are the practitioners who conduct physiological assessments specially trained in the use of such technologies?
  5. Is informed consent obtained when physiological assessments are conducted with sex offenders?
  6. When physiological assessments are conducted, are the results shared with other professionals responsible for the management of these cases?
  7. Are the results and recommendations from physiological assessments used to inform the development of treatment and supervision plans as part of a more comprehensive approach to sex offender management?
  8. Do stakeholders in the sex offender management process understand the specific strengths and limitations associated with the various physiological tools?
  9. Do policies or procedures prohibit the results of physiological assessments from being used as the sole criterion for critical decisionmaking (e.g., release, treatment completion or termination, violation of supervision conditions)?
  10. In practice, do these safeguards ensure that the results of physiological assessments are not used as the sole criterion for critical decisionmaking (e.g., release, treatment completion or termination, violation of supervision conditions)?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Physiological Assessments of Sexual Arousal, Interests, and Preferences

  1. Do policies or procedures address the use of physiological assessments of arousal, interests, and preferences as part of an overall assessment strategy with juvenile sex offenders?
  2. In practice, are physiological assessments of sexual arousal, interests, and preferences used as part of an overall assessment strategy with juvenile sex offenders?
  3. Do policies or procedures include restrictions on the use of physiological assessment techniques with juvenile sex offenders (e.g., based on age, developmental level, maturity, cognitive functioning)?
  4. In practice, is the use of physiological assessment techniques with juvenile sex offenders restricted (e.g., based on age, developmental level, maturity, cognitive functioning)?
  5. If physiological assessments of sexual arousal, interests, and preferences are conducted with youth, are the following procedures utilized:
    • Penile plethysmograph?
    • Viewing time?
    • Polygraph (as an indirect measure through sexual history)?
  6. Are the practitioners who conduct physiological assessments specially trained in the use of such technologies?
  7. Is informed consent from the youth and parents/guardians obtained when physiological assessments are conducted with juvenile sex offenders?
  8. When physiological assessments are conducted with youth, are the results shared with other professionals responsible for the management of these cases?
  9. Are the results and recommendations from physiological assessments used to inform the development of treatment and case management plans as part of a more comprehensive approach to juvenile sex offender management?
  10. Do stakeholders in the juvenile sex offender management process under stand the specific strengths and limitations associated with the various physiological tools, particularly when used with youth?
  11. Do policies or procedures prohibit the results of physiological assessments from being used as the sole criterion for critical decisionmaking (e.g., release, treatment completion or termination, violation of supervision conditions) with juvenile sex offenders?
  12. In practice, do these safeguards ensure that the results of physiological assessments are not used as the sole criterion for critical decisionmaking (e.g., release, treatment completion or termination, violation of supervision conditions) with juvenile sex offenders?