Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Specialized Caseloads

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures provide for specialized sex offender caseloads?
  2. In practice, have specialized sex offender caseloads been established?
  3. Do policies or procedures establish a process for selecting supervision officers to work with sex offenders?
  4. In practice, is the assignment of supervision officers to specialized caseloads voluntary?
  5. Are specialized caseloads limited in size to enhance the ability of supervision officers to work with sex offenders effectively and to conduct casework in the community?
  6. Do policies or procedures require supervision officers to conduct field contacts with sex offenders under supervision?
  7. Do policies or procedures specify field contact requirements (e.g., frequency, location)?
  8. In practice, do supervision officers conduct field contacts with sex offenders under supervision?
  9. If field visits are conducted by supervision officers, are the following locations included:
    • Residence?
    • Employment?
    • Treatment groups?
    • Others?
  10. Do policies or procedures require that field contacts occur outside of traditional business hours?
  11. In practice, when supervision officers conduct field visits, do contacts occur outside of traditional business hours?
  12. Are supervision officers afforded flexible schedules to allow for supervision activities that occur outside of traditional business hours?
  13. Are field contacts informed by the specific risk factors, needs, and circumstances of each offender?
  14. Are a portion of the field contacts unscheduled or unannounced?
  15. Are supervision agency administrators aware of the increased potential for secondary trauma and burnout among supervision officers who work with sex offenders?
  16. Have formal responses been developed within the supervision agency to identify and address symptoms of secondary trauma or burnout among supervision officers?
  17. Do supervision officers receive specific training to prevent or mitigate the symptoms of secondary trauma or burnout?
  18. Are resources readily available for supervision officers who are experiencing secondary trauma or burnout?

Specialized Knowledge and Training

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require supervision officers who work with sex offenders to receive specialized training on issues related to sex offender management?
  2. In practice, do supervision officers who work with sex offenders receive specialized training on issues related to sex offender management?
  3. In practice, is the training ongoing?
  4. Do supervision agency administrators receive specialized training on issues related to sex offender management?
  5. Does the specialized training that supervision officers receive address the following key issues:
    • Dynamics of sex offending?
    • Diversity of sex offenders?
    • Similarities and differences between adult sex offenders and their juvenile counterparts?
    • Balancing monitoring and surveillance activities with a focus on promoting offenders’ engagement in programming and services?
    • Principles of sex offender treatment?
    • Involving community support networks?
    • Assessing sex offender risk and needs, with a specific focus on the dynamic risk factors associated with recidivism?
    • Collaborating to enhance sex offender supervision?
    • Developing and adjusting specialized conditions?
    • Using a continuum of responses to address violations or risk factors?
    • Others?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Specialized Caseloads

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures provide for specialized juvenile sex offender caseloads?
  2. In practice, have specialized juvenile sex offender caseloads been established?
  3. Do policies or procedures establish a process for selecting supervision officers or case managers to work with juvenile sex offenders?
  4. In practice, is the assignment of supervision officers or case managers to specialized caseloads voluntary?
  5. Are specialized caseloads limited in size to enhance the ability of supervision officers or case managers to work with juvenile sex offenders effectively and to conduct casework in the community?
  6. Do policies or procedures require supervision officers or case managers to conduct field contacts with juvenile sex offenders under supervision?
  7. Do policies or procedures specify field contact requirements (e.g., frequency, location)?
  8. In practice, do supervision officers or case managers conduct field contacts with juvenile sex offenders under supervision?
  9. If field visits are conducted by supervision officers, are the following locations included:
    • Home?
    • School?
    • Treatment groups?
    • Others?
  10. Do policies or procedures require that field contacts occur outside of traditional business hours?
  11. In practice, when supervision officers conduct field visits, do contacts occur outside of traditional business hours?
  12. Are supervision officers afforded flexible schedules to allow for supervision activities that occur outside of traditional business hours?
  13. Are a portion of the field contacts unscheduled or unannounced?
  14. Are field contacts informed by the specific risk factors, needs, and circumstances of each juvenile offender?
  15. Are juvenile supervision agency administrators aware of the increased potential for secondary trauma and burnout among supervision officers or case managers who work with juvenile sex offenders?
  16. Have formal responses been developed within the supervision agency to identify and address symptoms of secondary trauma or burnout among supervision officers or case managers?
  17. Do supervision officers or case managers receive specific training to prevent or mitigate the symptoms of secondary trauma or burnout?
  18. Are resources readily available for supervision officers or case managers who are experiencing secondary trauma or burnout?

Specialized Knowledge and Training

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require supervision officers or case managers who work with juvenile sex offenders to receive specialized training on issues related to juvenile sex offender management?
  2. In practice, do supervision officers or case managers who work with juvenile sex offenders receive specialized training on issues related to juvenile sex offender management?
  3. Is the training that supervision officers or case managers receive ongoing?
  4. Do juvenile supervision agency administrators receive specialized training on issues related to juvenile sex offender management?
  5. Does the specialized training that juvenile supervision officers or case managers receive address the following key issues:
    • Dynamics of juvenile sex offending?
    • Diversity of juvenile sex offenders?
    • Similarities and differences between adult and juvenile sex offenders?
    • Balancing monitoring and surveillance activities with a focus on promot ing juvenile offenders’ engagement in programming and services?
    • Principles of sex offender treatment for juveniles?
    • Involving community support networks (including the parents or care givers of juvenile sex offenders)?
    • Assessing juvenile sex offender risk and needs, with a specific focus on the dynamic risk factors associated with recidivism?
    • Collaborating to enhance juvenile sex offender supervision?
    • Developing and adjusting specialized conditions?
    • Using a continuum of responses to address violations or risk factors?
    • Others?