Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Multidisciplinary Collaboration

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require a multi–disciplinary team for sex offender management?
  2. In practice, do multidisciplinary sex offender management teams exist?
  3. Is membership on these teams diverse (e.g., supervision officer, treatment provider, victim advocate, polygraph examiner, others)?
  4. Do policies or procedures clearly articulate and define the roles and responsibilities of supervision officers, treatment providers, and others in the context of the collaborative working relationships that are critical to successful sex offender management?

Reliance on Community Support Networks

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require the development of community support networks as part of an overall supervision strategy for sex offenders?
  2. Do policies or procedures specify monthly field contact requirements (i.e., frequency, location) with members of community support networks?
  3. In practice, are community support networks developed to enhance supervision practices with sex offenders?
  4. Do supervision officers conduct field contacts with members of community support networks?
  5. Do supervision officers educate members of community support networks about principles and practices of effective sex offender management, with a focus on the dynamic risk factors that must be monitored over time?
  6. Are members of community support networks informed about how information that is shared with supervision officers may be used?
  7. Do community support networks have diverse memberships that allow for monitoring and support in multiple settings?
  8. Do supervision officers assess the appropriateness of the individual members of community support networks?
  9. Do members of community support networks understand the individual risk factors and patterns of the offenders whom they are assisting?
  10. Are members of community support networks familiar with the supervision case plans of the offenders with whom they are working?
  11. Do supervision officers utilize information obtained from community support networks to inform case management decisions over time?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Multidisciplinary Collaboration

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require a multi–disciplinary team in the management of sex offenders?
  2. In practice, do multidisciplinary juvenile sex offender management teams exist?
  3. Is membership on these teams diverse (e.g., supervision officer or case manager, treatment provider, victim advocate, school representative, others)?
  4. Do policies or procedures clearly articulate and define the roles and responsibilities of juvenile supervision officers or case managers, treatment providers, and others in the context of the collaborative working relationships that are critical to successful sex offender management?

Reliance on Community Support Networks

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require the development of community support networks as part of an overall supervision strategy for juvenile sex offenders?
  2. Do policies or procedures specify monthly field contact requirements (i.e., frequency, location) with members of community support networks?
  3. In practice, are community support networks developed to enhance supervision practices with juvenile sex offenders?
  4. Do supervision officers or case managers conduct field contacts with members of community support networks?
  5. Do supervision officers or case managers work to educate members of community support networks about principles and practices of effective juvenile sex offender management, with a focus on the dynamic risk factors that must be monitored over time?
  6. Are members of community support networks informed about how information that is shared with supervision officers or case managers may be used?
  7. Do community support networks have diverse memberships that allow for monitoring and support in multiple settings?
  8. Do supervision officers or case managers assess the appropriateness of the individual members of community support networks?
  9. Do members of community support networks understand the individual risk factors and patterns of the juvenile offenders whom they are assisting?
  10. Are members of community support networks familiar with the supervision case plans of the juvenile offenders with whom they are working?
  11. Do supervision officers utilize information obtained from community support networks to inform case management decisions over time?
  12. Do policies or procedures specifically include the expectation that parents will be involved in the supervision process as members of community support networks?
  13. In practice, are concerted efforts made to include parents as members of community support networks?
  14. Do supervision officers or case managers facilitate active the engagement of parents/caregivers in the supervision process?
  15. Do policies or procedures specifically include the expectation that school personnel (e.g., counselors, coaches, teachers) will be involved in the supervision process as members of community support networks?
  16. In practice, are concerted efforts made to include school personnel as members of community support networks?
  17. Have local schools developed policies or procedures that explicate the process by which education staff members will be involved in the day–to–day supervision of juvenile sex offenders?
  18. Are management plans in the school setting individualized and based on the risk levels, needs, and circumstances of juvenile sex offenders?
  19. If the victim and the juvenile offender attend the same school and it is determined that the safety and well–being of the victim cannot be assured, is the offender required to find an alternative educational arrangement?
  20. Do management plans in the school setting prioritize the needs of vulnerable individuals?
  21. Do school personnel who are involved in the supervision of juvenile sex offenders receive specialized training, with a focus on the dynamic risk factors that must be monitored?