Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Responses to Violations

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures provide specific direction to supervision officers with respect to responding to violation behaviors?
  2. Is a continuum of responses available to respond effectively to offenders’ violation behaviors?
  3. Do supervision officers provide responses or sanctions (either formal or informal) to all violations?
  4. Do responses to violations take into consideration the following factors:
    • Seriousness of the behavior?
    • Relationship of the behavior to sex offending?
    • Risk level of the offender?
    • Degree to which community and/or victim safety was jeopardized?
    • Whether the offender voluntarily disclosed the behavior or maintained secrecy?
    • Level of responsibility assumed by the offender?
    • Awareness and disclosure of the behavior by members of the community support network?
    • Ability and willingness of the offender to develop and adhere to a realistic plan to address the behavior?
    • Presence of assets or services to assist the offender in maintaining compliance?
  5. Do policies or procedures include a range of pre–revocation interventions, responses, and graduated sanctions that can be used with sex offenders?
  6. In practice, are the following pre–revocation interventions, responses, and graduated sanctions used with sex offenders:
    • Additional restrictions or specialized conditions?
    • Increases in the frequency of office visits or other contacts?
    • Earlier curfews?
    • Restrictions on movement in the community?
    • Limits on recreational activities?
    • Home detention/house arrest?
    • Electronic monitoring?
  7. In practice, are the following treatment– and programming–based options
    used with sex offenders?
    • Requiring that the issue be addressed specifically in treatment?
    • Participating in residential or institutional programming as a “day treatment” option?
    • Enrolling in new or different community–based services?
  8. What percentage of sex offenders under community supervision are violated for purely technical matters? %
  9. What percentage of sex offenders under community supervision are violated for engaging in new criminal behavior? %
  10. What percentage of sex offenders under community supervision are violated for new sex crimes? %
  11. What percentage of sex offenders under community supervision are revoked and subsequently incarcerated or returned to incarceration for purely technical violations? %
  12. What percentage of sex offenders under community supervision are revoked and subsequently incarcerated or returned to incarceration for engaging in new, non–sexual criminal behavior? %
  13. What percentage of sex offenders under community supervision are revoked and subsequently incarcerated or returned to incarceration for engaging in a new sex offense? %

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Responses to Violations

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures provide specific direction to supervision officers or case managers with respect to responding to violation behaviors?
  2. Is a continuum of responses available to respond effectively to juvenile offenders’ violation behaviors?
  3. Do supervision officers or case managers provide responses or sanctions (either formal or informal) to all violations?
  4. Do responses to violations take into consideration the following factors:
    • Seriousness of the behavior?
    • Relationship of the behavior to sex offending?
    • Risk level of the juvenile offender?
    • Degree to which community and/or victim safety was jeopardized?
    • Whether the juvenile offender voluntarily disclosed the behavior or maintained secrecy?
    • Level of responsibility assumed by the juvenile offender?
    • Awareness and disclosure of the behavior by members of the community support network?
    • Ability and willingness of the juvenile offender to develop and adhere to a realistic plan to address the behavior?
    • Presence of assets or services to assist the juvenile offender in maintaining compliance?
  5. Do policies or procedures include a range of pre–revocation interventions, responses, and graduated sanctions that can be used with juvenile sex offenders?
  6. In practice, are the following pre–revocation interventions, responses, and graduated sanctions used with juvenile sex offenders:
    • Additional restrictions or specialized conditions?
    • Increases in the frequency of office visits or other contacts?
    • Earlier curfews?
    • Restrictions on movement in the community?
    • Limits on recreational activities?
    • Home detention/house arrest?
    • Electronic monitoring?
  7. In practice, are the following treatment- and programming–based options used with juvenile sex offenders?
    • Requiring that the issue be addressed specifically in treatment?
    • Participating in residential or institutional programming as a “day treatment” option?
    • Enrolling in new or different community–based services?
  8. What percentage of juvenile sex offenders under community supervision
    are violated for purely technical matters? %
  9. What percentage of juvenile sex offenders under community supervision are violated for engaging in new criminal behavior? %
  10. What percentage of juvenile sex offenders are violated for a new sex crime? %
  11. What percentage of juvenile sex offenders under community supervision are revoked and subsequently placed in residential or institutional facilities for purely technical violations? %
  12. What percentage of juvenile sex offenders under community supervision are revoked and subsequently placed in residential or institutional facilities for engaging in new, non–sexual criminal behavior? %
  13. What percentage of juvenile sex offenders under community supervision are revoked and subsequently placed in residential or institutional facilities for engaging in a new sex offense? %