Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Availability, Capacity, and Accessibility

Continuum of Care

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Does a range of treatment options exist for sex offenders, from community– to prison–based services?
  2. Are sentencing/placement decisions for sex offenders informed by:
    • Pre–sentence investigations?
    • Psychosexual evaluations?
    • Validated, sex offender–specific risk assessment tools?
  3. Are sentencing/placement decisions for sex offenders informed by the assessed risk level (e.g., secure correctional facilities for higher risk offenders)?
  4. Are policies or procedures in place that afford correctional agencies the latitude to make well–informed adjustments to the level of care based on significant changes (e.g., increases or decreases) in sex offender risk?

Prison–Based Sex Offender Treatment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Does legislation or do other mandates require corrections agencies to offer prison–based sex offender treatment?
  2. Are sex offenders required to participate in prison–based sex offender treatment?
  3. Are parole/early release considerations for sex offenders contingent upon their successful participation in prison–based sex offender treatment?
  4. Is sex offender treatment available within correctional facilities?
  5. During intake/reception, are sex offenders notified about the availability of sex offender treatment services and the ways to access such services?
  6. Are sex offenders able to access prison–based sex offender treatment in a timely manner?
  7. Is the capacity of prison–based sex offender treatment programs sufficient to allow sex offenders to complete treatment prior to their release date?
  8. Do standards or guidelines outline the ways in which prison–based sex offender treatment should be delivered?
  9. Is a range of sex offender treatment services available within correctional facilities (e.g., psychoeducational services, intensive programming)?
  10. Do policies or procedures delineate a process by which sex offenders are assigned to prison–based sex offender treatment based on assessed level of risk (intensive programming for higher risk sex offenders)?
  11. In practice, are sex offenders assigned to prison–based sex offender treatment based on assessed level of risk (intensive programming for higher risk sex offenders)?
  12. Do policies or procedures delineate a process for prioritizing sex offenders for prison–based sex offender treatment based upon presumed release dates?
  13. In practice, are sex offenders prioritized for prison–based sex offender treatment based upon presumed release dates?
  14. Are sex offenders who are not participating in prison–based treatment reassessed periodically to re–evaluate their level of interest and to encourage them to engage in treatment?
  15. Do policies or procedures allow sex offenders to be transitioned to less secure settings after progressing in treatment?
  16. In practice, are sex offenders transitioned to less secure settings after progressing in treatment?
  17. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs allow for offenders not incarcerated for sex offenses to access these services if such a need is evident?
  18. Are treatment refusals documented in each offender’s record?
  19. Does legislation or do other mandates require sex offenders who are placed directly on probation to participate in community–based sex offender treatment?

Community–Based Programs

  1. Does legislation or do other mandates require sex offenders under supervision post–release from prison to participate in community–based sex offender treatment?
  2. Is sex offender treatment available in the community?
  3. Are sex offenders who are placed directly on probation able to access community–based sex offender treatment immediately?
  4. Are sex offenders who are released from prison able to access community–based sex offender treatment immediately?
  5. Do standards or guidelines outline the ways in which community–based sex offender treatment should be delivered?
  6. Do community–based and prison–based sex offender treatment programs use the same model of treatment (to promote continuity of care)?
  7. Do community–based treatment providers limit their scope of services only to those clients whom they are qualified to treat?
  8. Can non justice–involved individuals access community–based sex offender treatment, if needed?
  9. Do community–based sex offender treatment providers demonstrate a commitment to collaborate with supervision officers, family therapists, child welfare professionals, and others to:
    • Share assessment information?
    • Discuss levels of risk and needs?
    • Review treatment progress and compliance with treatment and supervision expectations?
    • Coordinate day–to–day case management efforts?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Availability, Capacity, and Accessibility

Continuum of Care

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require juveniles to receive treatment in the least restrictive setting allowable based on assessed level of risk?
  2. In practice, are juvenile sex offenders treated in the least restrictive setting allowable based on assessed level of risk?
  3. Does a range of treatment programming exist for juvenile sex offenders, from community–based options to services in residential and juvenile correctional facilities?
  4. Are sentencing/placement decisions for juvenile sex offenders informed by:
    • Pre–disposition reports?
    • Psychosexual evaluations?
    • Research–supported, juvenile sex offender–specific risk assessment tools?
  5. Are sentencing/placement decisions for juvenile sex offenders informed by the assessed risk level (e.g., secure residential or juvenile correctional facilities for higher risk youth, community–based options for those who are lower risk)?
  6. Are policies or procedures in place that afford juvenile justice or youth corrections agencies the latitude to make well–informed adjustments to the level of care based on significant changes (e.g., increases or decreases) in risk and need?

Facility–Based Treatment for Juveniles

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Does legislation or do other mandates require specialized, offense–specific treatment for juvenile sex offenders who are in the custody of juvenile justice agencies?
  2. Is specialized sex offender treatment for juveniles available within juvenile correctional facilities?
  3. Are juvenile sex offenders able to access sex offender treatment within residential or juvenile correctional facilities in a timely manner?
  4. Is the treatment capacity in juvenile facilities sufficient to accommodate the number of juvenile sex offenders in need of those services?
  5. Do standards or guidelines outline the ways in which sex offender treatment in residential or juvenile correctional facilities will be delivered to juveniles?
  6. Is there a range of sex offender treatment services available in juvenile correctional facilities (e.g., psychoeducational services, intensive programming)?
  7. Do private residential treatment centers provide specialized sex offender treatment to juveniles?
  8. Do policies or procedures require consideration of the following factors when making facility placement decisions for juvenile sex offenders:
    • Least restrictive alternative?
    • Proximity to home and/or community?
    • Caregiver capacity and involvement?
    • Access to victims?
    • Risk and needs of the juvenile?
  9. In practice, are the following factors considered when making facility placement decisions for juvenile sex offenders:
    • Least restrictive alternative?
    • Proximity to home and/or community?
    • Caregiver capacity and involvement?
    • Access to victims?
    • Risk and needs of the juvenile?
  10. Do policies or procedures require the establishment of specific, measurable, risk management–related treatment goals for each juvenile sex offender that will allow for the safe transition to less restrictive settings (including the community) to receive continuing services?
  11. In practice, are juvenile sex offenders transferred in a timely manner to less restrictive alternatives when they no longer require the current level of structure or care?
  12. Can juveniles who are placed in residential treatment centers or juvenile correctional facilities for a non–sex offense access sex offender treatment if that need is subsequently identified?
  13. Are treatment refusals documented in the juveniles’ records?

Community–Based Programs for Juvenile Sex Offenders

  1. Does legislation or do other mandates require juvenile sex offenders who are placed directly on probation to participate in community–based sex offender treatment?
  2. Does legislation or do other mandates require juvenile sex offenders under supervision post–release from a facility to participate in community–based sex offender treatment?
  3. Is juvenile sex offender treatment available in the community?
  4. Are juvenile sex offenders who are placed directly on probation able to access community–based sex offender treatment immediately?
  5. Are juvenile sex offenders who are released from facilities able to access community–based sex offender treatment immediately?
  6. Do standards or guidelines outline the ways in which community–based treatment for juvenile sex offenders should be delivered?
  7. Do community–based and facility–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs use the same model of treatment (to promote continuity of care)?
  8. Are the parents or caregivers of juvenile sex offenders expected to be actively involved in the community–based treatment process?
  9. Do community–based providers limit their scope of services only to those juveniles whom they are qualified to treat?
  10. Can non juvenile justice–involved youth access community–based sex offender treatment if such a need is identified?
  11. Do sex offender treatment providers who work with juveniles demonstrate a commitment to collaborate with case managers, supervision officers, family therapists, child welfare professionals, and others to:
    • Share assessment information?
    • Discuss levels of risk and needs?
    • Review treatment progress and compliance with treatment and supervision expectations?
    • Coordinate day–to–day case management efforts?