Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Guiding Frameworks and Goals

Prison–Based Sex Offender Treatment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs use a cognitive–behavioral approach?
  2. Are prison–based sex offender treatment programs designed to assist clients with meeting the following goals:
    • Modifying thinking errors, cognitive distortions, or dysfunctional schemas that support offending behaviors?
    • Dealing with emotions and impulses in positive ways?
    • Developing or enhancing healthy interpersonal and relationship skills, including communication, perspective–taking, and intimacy?
    • Managing deviant sexual arousal or interest, while increasing appropriate sexual interests?
    • Practicing healthy coping skills that address identified risk factors?
    • Establishing or expanding positive support systems?
    • Addressing needs in positive ways and not at the expense of others?
    • Leading a productive, satisfying, and fulfilling life that is incompatible with sex offending?

Community–Based Sex Offender Treatment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs use a cognitive–behavioral approach?
  2. Are community–based sex offender treatment programs designed to assist clients with meeting the following goals:
    • Modifying thinking errors, cognitive distortions, or dysfunctional schemas that support offending behaviors?
    • Dealing with emotions and impulses in positive ways?
    • Developing or enhancing healthy interpersonal and relationship skills, including communication, perspective–taking, and intimacy?
    • Managing deviant sexual arousal or interest, while increasing appropriate sexual interests?
    • Practicing healthy coping skills that address identified risk factors?
    • Establishing or expanding positive support systems?
    • Addressing needs in positive ways and not at the expense of others?
    • Leading a productive, satisfying, and fulfilling life that is incompatible with sex offending?

Prison–Based Sex Offender Treatment: Modes, Methods, and Targets

Modes and Methods of Delivery

  1. Are the following treatment modalities used for prison–based sex offender treatment:
    • Group?
    • Individual?
    • Couples or marital?
    • Family?
  2. When groups are utilized for prison–based sex offender treatment, do practices reflect the following:
    • Co–facilitation by two clinicians?
    • Limited in size to 8–10 clients?
    • High risk clients separated from low risk clients?
    • Males separated from females?
    • Higher functioning sex offenders separated from those who are lower functioning?
    • Adults separated from juveniles?

Primary Treatment Targets (Criminogenic Needs)

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs target the following:
    • Sexual deviance variables?
    • Antisocial orientation?
    • Intimacy deficits?
    • Pro–offending attitudes and schemas?

Other Common Targets of Treatment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs target the following non–criminogenic needs:
    • Self–esteem?
    • Social skills?
    • Problem–solving?
    • Stress management?
    • Sex education?
    • Trauma resolution?
    • Offense responsibility?
    • Victim awareness?
  2. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs target more criminogenic needs than non–criminogenic needs?

Community–Based Sex Offender Treatment: Modes, Methods, and Targets

Modes and Methods of Delivery

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are the following treatment modalities utilized for community–based sex offender treatment:
    • Group?
    • Individual?
    • Couples or marital?
    • Family?
  2. When groups are utilized for community–based sex offender treatment, do practices reflect the following:
    • Co–facilitation by two clinicians?
    • Limited in size to 8–10 clients?
    • High risk clients separated from low risk clients?
    • Males separated from females?
    • Higher functioning sex offenders separated from those who are lower functioning?
    • Adults separated from juveniles?

Primary Treatment Targets (Criminogenic Needs)

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs target the following:
    • Sexual deviance variables?
    • Antisocial orientation?
    • Intimacy deficits?
    • Pro–offending attitudes and schemas?

Other Common Targets of Treatment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs target the following non–criminogenic needs:
    • Self–esteem?
    • Social skills?
    • Problem–solving?
    • Stress management?
    • Sex education?
    • Trauma resolution?
    • Offense responsibility?
    • Victim awareness?
  2. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs target more criminogenic needs than non–criminogenic needs?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Guiding Frameworks and Goals

Residential/Juvenile Correctional Treatment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do juvenile sex offender treatment programs in residential/juvenile correctional facilities use a cognitive–behavioral approach?
  2. Are juvenile sex offender treatment programs in residential/juvenile correctional facilities designed to assist clients in meeting the following goals:
    • Modifying thinking errors, cognitive distortions, or dysfunctional schemas that support offending behaviors?
    • Dealing with emotions and impulses in positive ways?
    • Developing or enhancing healthy interpersonal skills (e.g., communication, assertiveness, social)?
    • Managing deviant sexual arousal or interest, while increasing appropriate sexual interests?
    • Practicing healthy coping skills that address identified risk factors?
    • Improving family functioning?
    • Promoting positive school achievement?
    • Establishing or expanding positive peer relationships and other support systems?
    • Addressing needs in positive ways and not at the expense of others?
    • Leading a productive, satisfying, and fulfilling life that is incompatible with sex offending?

Community–Based Treatment

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do community–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs use a cognitive–behavioral approach?
  2. Do community–based programs utilize Multisystemic Therapy (MST) as a framework for intervening with juvenile sex offenders?
  3. Are community–based treatment interventions for juvenile sex offenders designed to assist clients in meeting the following goals:
    • Modifying thinking errors, cognitive distortions, or dysfunctional schemas that support offending behaviors?
    • Dealing with emotions and impulses in positive ways?
    • Developing or enhancing healthy interpersonal skills (e.g., communication, assertiveness, social)?
    • Managing deviant sexual arousal or interests, while increasing appropriate sexual interests?
    • Practicing healthy coping skills that address identified risk factors?
    • Improving family functioning?
    • Promoting positive school achievement?
    • Establishing or expanding positive peer relationships and other support systems?
    • Addressing needs in positive ways and not at the expense of others?
    • Leading a productive, satisfying, and fulfilling life that is incompatible with sex offending?

Residential/Juvenile Correctional Treatment for Juvenile Sex Offenders: Modes, Methods, and Targets

Modes and Methods of Delivery

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are the following treatment modalities used for residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs:
    • Group?
    • Individual?
    • Family?
  2. Do residential/juvenile correctional facilities offer parent education/support groups?
  3. Are visitation periods with juveniles and their parents/families used as therapeutic opportunities?
  4. Is family therapy initiated while juvenile sex offenders are in residential/juvenile correctional facilities?
  5. Is parent/family involvement an explicit focus of treatment for juvenile sex offenders in residential/juvenile correctional facilities?
  6. If treatment groups are used for residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs, do practices reflect the following:
    • Co–facilitation by two clinicians?
    • Limited in size to 8–10 clients?
    • High risk juveniles separated from low risk juveniles?
    • Juvenile males separated from juvenile females?
    • Higher functioning juveniles separated from lower functioning juveniles?

Treatment Targets

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs target the following:
    • Antisocial values and behaviors?
    • Social isolation?
    • Poor social skills?
    • Pro–offending attitudes and schemas?
    • Impulsivity?
    • Problematic parent–child relationships?
    • Self–esteem?
    • Emotion management?
    • Healthy sexuality and sex education?
    • Trauma resolution?
    • Offense acknowledgement and responsibility?
    • Awareness of victim impact?
    • Family functioning?
    • Deviant sexual interests?
  2. Are residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs designed to be developmentally–sensitive (i.e., do they take into account the unique characteristics and intervention needs of juveniles)?

Community–Based Treatment for Juvenile Sex Offenders: Modes, Methods, and Targets

Modes and Methods of Delivery

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are the following treatment modalities used for community–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs:
    • Group?
    • Individual?
    • Family?
  2. Do community–based treatment programs for juvenile sex offenders offer parent education/support groups?
  3. If treatment groups are used for community–based juvenile sex offender programs, do practices reflect the following:
    • Co–facilitation by two clinicians?
    • Limited in size to 8–10 clients?
    • High risk juveniles separated from low risk juveniles?
    • Juvenile males separated from juvenile females?
    • Higher functioning juveniles separated from lower functioning juveniles?

Treatment Targets

  1. Do community–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs target the following:
    • Antisocial values and behaviors?
    • Social isolation?
    • Poor social skills?
    • Pro–offending attitudes and schemas?
    • Impulsivity?
    • Problematic parent–child relationships?
    • Self–esteem?
    • Emotion management?
    • Healthy sexuality and sex education?
    • Trauma resolution?
    • Offense acknowledgement and responsibility?
    • Awareness of victim impact?
    • Family functioning?
    • Deviant sexual interests?
  2. Are community–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs designed to be developmentally–sensitive (i.e., do they take into account the unique characteristics and intervention needs of juveniles)?
  3. Is parent/family involvement an explicit focus of community–based treatment for juvenile sex offenders?