Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Pharmacological Interventions

Prison–Based Programs

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are incarcerated offenders prescribed psychotropic medications as warranted when “general” co–occurring psychiatric difficulties (e.g., depression, anxiety, psychotic disorders) are identified through the assessment process?

    If so, are they prescribed under the following conditions:

    • After informed consent/assent is provided by the offender?
    • As part of a broader, holistic approach to treatment?
    • With close monitoring by a qualified medical professional?
  2. Are antiandrogens or hormonal agents (e.g., Provera, Lupron) prescribed for adult sex offenders in prison–based programs as warranted?
  3. If so, are they incorporated as part of a broader sex offender treatment approach (e.g., as an adjunct to cognitive–behavioral treatment)?
  4. If antiandrogens or hormonal agents are ever used with adult sex offenders in correctional facilities, describe the circumstances, procedures, and safeguards below:
  5. Are SSRIs prescribed for adult sex offenders in prison–based programs to assist offenders with managing paraphilic symptoms (specifically because of the sexual side effects)?
  6. If so, are they incorporated as part of a broader sex offender treatment approach (e.g., as an adjunct to cognitive–behavioral treatment)?
  7. If pharmacological interventions are used with adult sex offenders explicitly as a “sex offender intervention,” are they used under the following conditions:
    • On a voluntary basis?
    • After offenders provide informed consent and following patient education about the strengths, limitations, risks, and benefits?
    • With close monitoring by qualified medical professionals?
    • With the prescribing medical professionals playing an active role on sex offender treatment teams?
    • With sex offender program staff receiving education about the strengths, limitations, risks, and benefits of these interventions?

Community–Based Programs

  1. Are antiandrogens or hormonal agents (e.g., Provera, Lupron) prescribed for adult sex offenders in community–based programs as warranted?
  2. If so, are they incorporated as part of a broader sex offender treatment approach (e.g., as an adjunct to cognitive–behavioral treatment)?
  3. If antiandrogens or hormonal agents are ever used with adult sex offenders in community–based settings, describe the circumstances, procedures, and safeguards below:
  4. Are SSRIs prescribed for adult sex offenders in community–based settings to assist offenders with managing paraphilic symptoms (specifically because of the sexual side effects)?
  5. If so, are they incorporated as part of a broader sex offender treatment approach (e.g., as an adjunct to cognitive–behavioral treatment)?
  6. If pharmacological interventions are used with adult sex offenders explicitly as a “sex offender intervention” in the community, are they used under the following conditions:
    • On a voluntary basis?
    • After offenders provide informed consent and following patient education about the strengths, limitations, risks, and benefits?
    • With close monitoring by qualified medical professionals?
    • With the prescribing medical professionals playing an active role on sex offender case management teams (e.g., with treatment providers, supervision officers, community supports)?
    • With treatment providers, supervision officers, and members of community support networks receiving education about the strengths, limitations, risks, and benefits of these interventions?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Pharmacological Interventions

Residential/Juvenile Correctional Programs

  1. Are juveniles prescribed psychotropic medications as warranted when “general” co–occurring psychiatric difficulties (e.g., ADHD, depression, anxiety, psychotic disorders) are identified through the assessment process?
    If so, are they prescribed under the following conditions:
    • After informed consent/assent is provided by the juvenile and parent/guardian?
    • As part of a broader, holistic approach to treatment?
    • With close monitoring by a qualified medical professional?
    • With an awareness of the FDA warnings about SSRIs with juveniles?
  2. If antiandrogens or hormonal agents are ever used with juvenile sex offenders in residential/juvenile correctional facilities, describe the circumstances, procedures, and safeguards below (including age restrictions, diagnoses, informed consent process, patient/parent/staff education, monitoring):
  3. If SSRIs are ever used with juvenile sex offenders in residential/juvenile correctional facilities as a means of managing paraphilic symptoms, describe the circumstances, procedures, and safeguards below (including age restrictions, diagnoses, informed consent process, patient/parent/staff education, monitoring):

Community–Based Programs

  1. If antiandrogens or hormonal agents are ever used with juvenile sex offenders in community–based settings, describe the circumstances, procedures, and safeguards below (including age restrictions, diagnoses, informed consent process, patient/parent/staff education, monitoring):
  2. If SSRIs are ever used with juvenile sex offenders in community–based settings as a means of managing paraphilic symptoms, describe the circumstances, procedures, and safeguards below (including age restrictions, diagnoses, informed consent process, patient/parent/staff education, monitoring):