Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Prison–Based Treatment Programs

Treatment Planning

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures guide the development of individualized treatment plans for sex offenders participating in prison–based treatment?
  2. In practice, are individualized treatment plans developed for sex offenders participating in prison–based treatment?
  3. Are treatment plans assessment–driven?
  4. Are sex offenders involved in the development of their treatment plans?
  5. Do treatment plans include the following:
    • Specific intervention needs?
    • Observable, measurable goals in treatment plans?
    • Specific interventions and modalities to address each need?
    • Professional responsible for delivering interventions?
    • Target dates for goal attainment?
  6. Do policies or procedures require routine (e.g., quarterly) treatment plan reviews and updates?
  7. In practice, are treatment plans reviewed and updated routinely (e.g., quarterly)?
  8. Are empirically–validated sex offender–specific assessment tools (e.g., Sex Offender Needs and Progress Scale) used to assess within–treatment changes over time?
  9. Are sex offenders involved in their treatment plan reviews?
  10. Do prison–based treatment providers seek input about offender progress from multiple sources (e.g., caseworkers, security staff)?

Completion and Termination

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated goals and objectives that individuals must meet in order to complete treatment?
  2. Are participating sex offenders able to articulate the specific goals and criteria that must be met in order to complete prison–based sex offender treatment?
  3. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated termination policies?
  4. Are participating sex offenders able to articulate the specific factors that may subject them to unsuccessful termination from the prison–based sex offender treatment program?
  5. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs use treatment contracts that outline responsibilities and expectations for participants?
  6. If so, are sex offenders expected to sign these treatment contracts to acknowledge their understanding of the program expectations?
  7. When concerns arise during the course of treatment, do prison–based sex offender programs use graduated levels of interventions/remedies prior to terminating offenders?
  8. Are offenders who are subject to potential termination from treatment reviewed by case management or multidisciplinary treatment teams?
  9. Are sex offenders afforded multiple opportunities for prison–based treatment if they have previously refused, been terminated, or voluntarily withdrawn from sex offender treatment?
  10. Do prison–based sex offender treatment programs maintain statistics on the following:
    • Number of sex offenders served in treatment?
    • Number of successful completions?
    • Number of unsuccessful terminations?
    • Length of stay in treatment?

Documentation

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) for each sex offender following each service delivery encounter?
  2. In practice, is standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) entered in each offender’s treatment record following each encounter?
  3. Do sex offenders’ prison–based treatment files include the following:
    • Informed consent for treatment, including notice of confidentiality limits (e.g., mandated reporting, HIPAA requirements, interagency communication)?
    • Relevant current and historical records (e.g., police reports, court orders, prior treatment records)?
    • Assessment data (e.g., pre–sentence investigation, psychosexual evaluation, risk assessment)?
    • Signed treatment contract?
    • Individualized treatment plan?
    • Summazies for each treatment encounter?
    • Key communications with other stakeholders?
    • Treatment completion or termination summary?

Community–Based Treatment Programs

Treatment Planning

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures guide the development of individualized treatment plans for sex offenders participating in community–based treatment?
  2. In practice, are individualized treatment plans developed for sex offenders participating in community–based treatment?
  3. Are treatment plans assessment–driven?
  4. Are sex offenders involved in the development of their treatment plans?
  5. Do treatment plans include the following:
    • Specific intervention needs?
    • Observable, measurable goals in treatment plans?
    • Specific interventions and modalities to address each need?
    • Target dates for goal attainment?
  6. Do policies or procedures require routine (e.g., quarterly) treatment plan reviews and updates?
  7. In practice, are treatment plans reviewed and updated routinely (e.g., quarterly)?
  8. Are empirically–validated sex offender–specific assessment tools (e.g., Sex Offender Needs and Progress Scale) used to assess within–treatment changes over time?
  9. Are sex offenders involved in their treatment plan reviews?
  10. Do community–based treatment providers seek input about offender progress from multiple sources (e.g., supervision officers, members of community–support networks)?

Completion and Termination

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated goals and objectives that individuals must meet in order to complete treatment?
  2. Are participating sex offenders able to articulate the specific goals and criteria that must be met in order to complete community–based sex offender treatment?
  3. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated termination policies?
  4. Are participating sex offenders able to articulate the specific factors that may subject them to unsuccessful termination from the community–based sex offender treatment program?
  5. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs use treatment contracts that outline responsibilities and expectations for participants?
  6. If so, are sex offenders expected to sign these treatment contracts to acknowledge their understanding of the program expectations?
  7. When concerns arise during the course of treatment, do community–based sex offender programs use graduated levels of interventions/remedies prior to terminating offenders?
  8. Are offenders who are subject to potential termination from treatment reviewed by case management or multidisciplinary treatment teams?
  9. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs maintain statistics on the following:
    • Number of sex offenders served in treatment?
    • Number of successful completions?
    • Number of unsuccessful terminations?
    • Length of stay in treatment?

Documentation

  1. Do policies or procedures require standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) for each sex offender following each service delivery encounter?
  2. In practice, is standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) entered in each offender’s treatment record following each encounter?
  3. Do sex offenders’ community–based treatment files include the following:
    • Informed consent for treatment, including notice of confidentiality limits (e.g., mandated reporting, HIPAA requirements, interagency communication)?
    • Relevant current and historical records (e.g., police reports, court orders, prior treatment records)?
    • Assessment data (e.g., pre–sentence investigation, psychosexual evaluation, risk assessment)?
    • Signed treatment contract?
    • Individualized treatment plan?Summaries for each treatment encounter?
    • Key communications with other stakeholders?
    • Treatment completion or termination summary?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Residential/Juvenile Correctional Treatment Programs

Treatment Planning

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures guide the development of individualized treatment plans for juvenile sex offenders participating in residential/juvenile correctional treatment?
  2. In practice, are individualized treatment plans developed for juvenile sex offenders participating in residential/juvenile correctional treatment?
  3. Are treatment plans assessment–driven?
  4. Are juvenile sex offenders and their parents/guardians involved in the development of their treatment plans?
  5. Do treatment plans include the following:
    • Specific intervention needs?
    • Observable, measurable goals in treatment plans?
    • Specific interventions and modalities to address each need?
    • Professional responsible for delivering interventions?
    • Target dates for goal attainment?
  6. Do policies or procedures require routine (e.g., quarterly) treatment plan reviews and updates?
  7. In practice, are treatment plans reviewed and updated routinely (e.g., quarterly)?
  8. Are empirically–validated juvenile sex offender–specific assessment tools (e.g., ERASOR, J–SOAP–II) used to assess within–treatment changes over time?
  9. Are juveniles and their parents/guardians involved in treatment plan reviews?
  10. Do residential/juvenile correctional treatment providers seek input about juveniles’ progress from multiple sources (e.g., youthcare workers, educators)?

Completion and Termination

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated goals and objectives that individuals must meet in order to complete treatment?
  2. Are juveniles and their parents/guardians able to articulate the specific goals and criteria that must be met in order to complete residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment?
  3. Do residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated termination policies?
  4. Are juveniles and their parents/guardians able to articulate the specific factors that may lead to unsuccessful termination from the residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment program?
  5. Do residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs use treatment contracts that outline responsibilities and expectations for participants?
  6. If so, are juveniles and their parents/guardians expected to sign these treatment contracts to acknowledge their understanding of the program expectations?
  7. When concerns arise during the course of treatment, do residential/juvenile correctional sex offender programs use graduated levels of interventions/remedies prior to terminating juveniles?
  8. Are juveniles who are subject to potential termination from treatment reviewed by case management or multidisciplinary treatment teams?
  9. Are juveniles afforded multiple opportunities for residential/juvenile correctional treatment if they have previously refused, been terminated, or voluntarily withdrew from sex offender treatment?
  10. Do residential/juvenile correctional sex offender treatment programs maintain statistics on the following:
    • Number of juvenile sex offenders served in treatment?
    • Number of successful completions?
    • Number of unsuccessful terminations?
    • Length of stay in treatment?

Documentation

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) for each juvenile following each service delivery encounter?
  2. In practice, is standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) entered in each juvenile’s treatment record following each encounter?
  3. In practice, do juveniles’ residential/juvenile correctional treatment files include the following:
    • Informed consent for treatment, including notice of confidentiality limits (e.g., mandated reporting, HIPAA requirements, interagency communication)?
    • Relevant current and historical records (e.g., police reports, court orders, prior treatment records)?
    • Assessment data (e.g., pre–sentence investigation, psychosexual evaluation, risk assessment)?
    • Signed treatment contract?
    • Individualized treatment plan?
    • Summaries for each treatment encounter?
    • Key communications with other stakeholders?
    • Treatment completion or termination summary?

Community–Based Treatment Programs

Treatment Planning

  1. Do policies or procedures guide the development of individualized treatment plans for juveniles participating in community–based treatment?
  2. In practice, are individualized treatment plans developed for juveniles participating in community–based treatment?
  3. Are treatment plans assessment–driven?
  4. Are juveniles and their parents/guardians involved in the development of their treatment plans?
  5. Do treatment plans include the following:
    • Specific intervention needs?
    • Observable, measurable goals?
    • Specific interventions and modalities to address each need?
    • Target dates for goal attainment?
  6. Do policies or procedures require routine (e.g., quarterly) treatment plan reviews and updates?
  7. In practice, are treatment plans reviewed and updated routinely (e.g., quarterly)?
  8. Are empirically–supported juvenile sex offender–specific assessment tools (e.g., ERASOR, J–SOAP–II) used to assess within–treatment changes over time?
  9. Are juveniles and their parents/guardians involved in their treatment plan reviews?
  10. Do community–based treatment providers seek input about juveniles’ progress from multiple sources (e.g., case managers, school officials, supervision officers, members of community–support networks)?

Completion and Termination

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do community–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated goals and objectives that individuals must meet in order to complete treatment?
  2. Are juveniles and their parents/guardians able to articulate the specific goals and criteria that must be met in order to complete community–based sex offender treatment?
  3. Do community–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs have clearly delineated termination policies?
  4. Are participating juveniles and their parents able to articulate the specific factors that may lead to unsuccessful termination from the community–based sex offender treatment program?
  5. Do community–based sex offender treatment programs use treatment contracts that outline responsibilities and expectations for participants?
  6. If so, are juveniles and their parents expected to sign these treatment contracts to acknowledge their understanding of the program expectations?
  7. When concerns arise during the course of treatment, do community–based sex offender programs use graduated levels of interventions/remedies prior to terminating juveniles?
  8. Are juveniles who are subject to potential termination from treatment reviewed by case management or multidisciplinary treatment teams?
  9. Do community–based juvenile sex offender treatment programs maintain statistics on the following:
    • Number of juveniles served in treatment?
    • Number of successful completions?
    • Number of unsuccessful terminations?
    • Length of stay in treatment?

Documentation

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures require standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) for each juvenile following each service delivery encounter?
  2. In practice, is standard documentation (e.g., progress notes) entered in each juvenile’s treatment record following each encounter?
  3. In practice, do juveniles’ community–based treatment files include the following:
    • Informed consent for treatment, including notice of confidentiality limits (e.g., mandated reporting, HIPAA requirements, interagency communication)?
    • Relevant current and historical records (e.g., police reports, court orders, prior treatment records)?
    • Assessment data (e.g., pre–sentence investigation, psychosexual evaluation, risk assessment)?
    • Signed treatment contract?
    • Individualized treatment plan?
    • Summaries for each treatment encounter?
    • Key communications with other stakeholders?
    • Treatment completion or termination summary?