Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Adopt an “In to Out” Philosophy of Sex Offender Management

Correctional Agency

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Does the correctional agency specifically address successful reentry within its formal mission?
  2. Do the correctional agency’s policies or procedures specifically address the roles that all staff within facilities—regardless of job titles—play in promoting successful reentry?
  3. In practice, do all staff within correctional facilities—regardless of their job titles—view themselves as having a specific role in promoting successful reentry?
  4. In practice, do identified staff (e.g., caseworkers) within correctional facilities collaborate and share information with key external agency/organizations outside of the corrections agency as a means of promoting successful reentry?

Community Supervision Agency

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Does the community supervision agency specifically address successful reentry within its formal mission?
  2. Do the community supervision agency’s policies or procedures specifically address the roles that supervision officers play in promoting successful reentry?
  3. In practice, do supervision officers view themselves as having a specific role in promoting successful reentry?
  4. In practice, do supervision officers collaborate and share information with other key agencies/organizations as a means of promoting successful reentry?

Inter–Agency

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Is an interagency charter or executive order in place that formalizes a collaborative partnership across state departments (e.g., corrections, parole, health, mental health, education, housing, employment) to promote successful reentry efforts statewide?
  2. If so, does it require agency heads to:
    • Have routine meetings (e.g., monthly, quarterly)?
    • Explore current barriers to successful reentry?
    • Collaboratively identify effective strategies to address barriers to successful reentry?
    • Develop complementary agency policies to support successful reentry?
    • Address the unique challenges for special offender populations (e.g., sex offenders)?
  3. Are efforts made to assist agency administrators, legislators, and other policymakers with gaining an understanding of sex offenders, effective management approaches, and promising approaches to sex offender reentry (e.g., development and distribution of informational materials, delivery of training)?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Adopt an “In to Out” Philosophy of Sex Offender Management

Juvenile Justice Agency

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Does the juvenile justice agency specifically address successful reentry within its formal mission?
  2. Do the juvenile justice agency’s policies or procedures specifically address the roles that all staff within facilities—regardless of job titles—play in promoting successful reentry?
  3. In practice, do all staff within juvenile facilities—regardless of their job titles—view themselves as having a specific role in promoting successful reentry?
  4. To promote successful reentry, do the juvenile justice agency’s policies or procedures include specific requirements pertaining to collaboration and information–sharing with key external agencies/organizations that have a role in reentry?
  5. In practice, do identified staff (e.g., caseworkers) within facilities collaborate and share information with key external agency/organizations outside of the juvenile justice agency as a means of promoting successful reentry?
  6. Do policies or procedures specifically address the roles that supervision officers/case managers play in promoting successful reentry?
  7. In practice, do supervision officers/case managers view themselves as having a specific role in promoting successful reentry?

Inter–Agency

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Is an interagency charter or executive order in place that formalizes a collaborative partnership across state departments (e.g., juvenile justice, health, mental health, education, housing, employment, social services) to promote successful reentry efforts statewide?
  2. If so, does it require agency heads to:
    • Have routine meetings (e.g., monthly, quarterly)?
    • Explore current barriers to successful reentry?
    • Collaboratively identify effective strategies to address barriers to successful reentry?
    • Develop complementary agency policies to support successful reentry?
    • Address the unique challenges for special offender populations (e.g., juvenile sex offenders)?
  3. Are efforts made to assist agency administrators, legislators, and other policymakers with gaining an understanding of juvenile sex offenders, effective management approaches, and promising approaches to their transition and community reintegration (e.g., development and distribution of informational materials, delivery of training)?