Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Use Early and Ongoing Assessments to Begin Guiding Reentry

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Within correctional facilities, do policies or procedures require the use of assessments at intake, or shortly thereafter with an eye towards reentry efforts?
  2. If so, do these policies or procedures include the use of research–supported sex offender–specific assessment tools?
  3. Do policies or procedures require the use of research–supported sex offender–specific tools to assess changes over time, as sex offenders approach release?
  4. In practice, do staff within correctional facilities use research–supported sex offender–specific tools to assess risk and identify targets of intervention specific to sex offenders early during the period of incarceration (e.g., at intake)?
  5. In practice, do staff within correctional facilities use research–supported sex offender–specific tools to assess changes over time, as sex offenders approach release?
  6. Do policies or procedures require correctional agencies and community supervision agencies to use a common assessment tool(s) to guide their respective case management decisions with sex offenders—from placement through reentry?
  7. In practice, do correctional staff and supervision officers use a common tool(s) to guide ongoing case management decisions with sex offenders—from institutional placement through reentry into the community?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Use Early and Ongoing Assessments to Begin Guiding Reentry

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Within juvenile facilities, do policies or procedures require the use of assessments at intake or shortly thereafter with an eye toward reentry efforts?
  2. If so, do these policies or procedures include the use of research–supported juvenile sex offender–specific assessment tools?
  3. Do policies or procedures require the use of research–supported juvenile sex offender–specific tools to assess changes over time, as juvenile sex offenders approach release?
  4. In practice, do staff within facilities use research–supported juvenile sex offender–specific tools to assess risk and identify targets of intervention specific to juvenile sex offenders early during these youths’ tenure in facilities (e.g., at intake)?
  5. In practice, do staff within juvenile facilities use research–supported juvenile sex offender–specific tools to assess changes over time, as juvenile sex offenders approach release?
  6. Do policies or procedures require staff in juvenile facilities and community supervision officers/case managers to use a common assessment tool(s) to guide their respective case management decisions with juvenile sex offenders from residential institutional placement through reentry into the community?
  7. In practice, do staff in juvenile facilities and supervision officers/case managers use a common assessment tool(s) to guide ongoing case management decisions with sex offenders—from residential/institutional placement through reentry into the community?

Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Invest in Evidence–Based Strategies and Other Key Services within Facilities to Support Sex Offender Reentry

  1. Has the correctional agency made a policy–level commitment to implement evidence–based interventions within facilities?
  2. Is sex offender–specific treatment available within the correctional institution(s)?
  3. Are the following additional rehabilitative services provided within the correctional institution(s):
    • Cognitive skills training?
    • Substance abuse treatment?
    • Family interventions?
    • Education?
    • Vocational skills training?
    • Healthcare services?
    • Mental health services?
    • Other?
  4. Are pre–release classes offered to sex offenders to ensure that they possess the basic life and independent living skills that will support successful reintegration?
  5. If such classes are offered, do they focus on:
    • Managing finances?
    • Job interviewing?
    • Parenting?
    • Maintaining hygiene?
    • Other?
  6. Is there a process in place that supports sex offenders’ efforts to obtain personalized identification (e.g., social security card, driver’s license, state identification card) prior to release?
  7. Are the unique barriers associated with sex offender reentry (e.g., coping with negative community reactions) addressed in pre–release programming, in order to assist offenders with developing effective coping skills to manage those issues when they arise?

Mitigate the Potential Negative Impact of Long Term Placements in Facilities

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do correctional agency policies or procedures outline the roles that non–treatment staff members (e.g., custody officers) can play in supporting treatment and reentry efforts?
  2. Is ongoing training provided to non–treatment staff (e.g., custody officers) to enhance their ability to recognize issues that are unique to sex offenders and intervene in ways that can support treatment and reentry efforts with these offenders?
  3. If so, are the following topics covered:
    • Myths and misperceptions about sex offenders?
    • Understanding effective sex offender management strategies?
    • Impact of prison violence (particularly with respect to sex offenders as targets) and staff’s role in prevention and intervention?
    • Potential negative implications of sexually exploitative materials within facilities?
    • Strategies to support the use of visitation as a mechanism for building or strengthening family relationships and other sources of community support?
    • Other?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Invest in Evidence–Based Strategies and Other Key Services within Facilities to Support Sex Offender Reentry

  1. Has the juvenile justice agency made a policy–level commitment to implement evidence–based interventions within facilities?
  2. Is sex offender–specific treatment provided within juvenile facilities?
  3. Are the following additional rehabilitative services provided within juvenile facilities:
    • Cognitive skills training?
    • Substance abuse treatment?
    • Family interventions?
    • Education?
    • Vocational skills training (if applicable)?
    • Healthcare services?
    • Mental health services?
    • Other?
  4. Are pre–release classes offered to juvenile sex offenders to ensure that they possess the basic life and independent living skills that will support successful reintegration?
  5. If such classes are offered, do they focus on:
    • Managing finances?
    • Completing employment applications?
    • Job interviewing skills?
    • Parenting (if applicable)?
    • Maintaining hygiene?
    • Other?
  6. Is there a process in place that supports juvenile sex offenders’ efforts to obtain personalized identification (e.g., social security card, driver’s license, state identification card) prior to release?
  7. Are the unique barriers associated with juvenile sex offender reentry (e.g., coping with negative community reactions) addressed in prerelease programming, in order to assist juveniles (and their families) with preparing for those barriers and identifying effective coping skills to manage those issues when they arise?

Mitigate the Potential Negative Impact of Long Term Placements in Facilities

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do juvenile justice policies or procedures outline the roles that non–treatment staff members (e.g., youthcare workers) have in the juvenile sex offender reentry process?
  2. Do juvenile justice administrators require ongoing training for non–treatment staff (e.g., youthcare workers) to enhance their ability to support juvenile sex offender treatment and reentry?
  3. If so, are the following topics covered:
    • Myths and misperceptions about juvenile sex offenders, including the dynamics of sexual abuse and effective management strategies?
    • Potential negative implications of sexually exploitative materials within facilities?
    • Strategies to support the use of visitation as a mechanism for building or strengthening family relationships and other sources of community support?
    • Other?
  4. Do juvenile justice agency administrators understand the potential impact of negative peer influences in residential/institutional facilities?
  5. Is training provided to residential/institutional facility staff regarding the potential negative impact of deviant peer influences in facilities?
  6. Are staff members equipped with the skills necessary to reinforce youthful sex offenders’ participation in treatment and support the efforts of these youth to practice new skills that are critical to their successful transition and community reintegration?