Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Enhance Reentry Outcomes Through Informed Release Decisionmaking

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do statutes allow sex offenders to be considered for discretionary release?
  2. Do policies or procedures delineate release guidelines or parameters that include consideration of the following:
    • Current results from empirically–validated sex offender–specific risk assessments?
    • Participation in sex offender treatment?
    • Treatment refusals?
    • Ongoing programming needs?
    • Family needs and concerns?
    • Proposed release plans?
    • Other?
  3. In practice, do release decisionmakers receive the following information in a timely manner:
    • Current results from empirically–validated sex offender–specific risk assessments?
    • Participation in sex offender treatment?
    • Treatment refusals?
    • Ongoing programming needs?
    • Family needs and concerns?
    • Proposed release plans?
    • Other?
  4. In practice, are conditional release decisions made in sex offense cases based on the following considerations:
    • Current results from empirically–validated sex offender–specific risk assessments?
    • Participation in sex offender treatment?
    • Treatment refusals?
    • Ongoing programming needs?
    • Family needs and concerns?
    • Proposed release plans?
    • Other?
  5. Do policies or procedures require release decisionmakers to impose specialized release conditions for sex offenders?
  6. In practice, do release decisionmakers impose specialized release conditions for sex offenders?
  7. Do release decisionmakers receive specialized training about sex offenders and the efficacy of management strategies?

Victim–Centeredness during Release Decisionmaking

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. 66. In practice, are interested victims notified when sex offenders’ release decisions, hearings are scheduled?
  2. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies require notification to interested victims when sex offenders’ release hearings are scheduled?
  3. If victims do not want to be notified about release hearings or release, can they “opt out” of the process?
  4. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies provide for victim input at release hearings through the following methods:
    • In–person testimony?
    • Via written statements?
    • Through victim advocates?
    • Other?
  5. In practice, are active attempts made to ensure that the release decisionmaking process is victim–centered, including:
    • Conducting release hearings at times and in locations that are convenient for victims?
    • Appointing victims or victim advocates to serve as members of release authorities?
    • Other?
  6. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies require notification of interested victims when sex offenders are released from correctional facilities?
  7. In practice, are interested victims notified when sex offenders are released from residential/institutional facilities?
  8. Are interested victims provided assistance with the development of safety plans prior to the release of sex offenders?
  9. Prior to the release of sex offenders, are no–contact orders in place when warranted?
  10. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies require release decisionmakers to address victim restitution as a part of release conditions for sex offenders?
  11. In practice, do release decisionmakers ensure that restitution orders are fulfilled prior to release or as a condition of post–release supervision?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Enhance Reentry Outcomes Through Informed Release Decisionmaking

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do juvenile/family courts and youth–serving agencies have policies or procedures for making objective, assessment–driven decisions about the placement of juvenile sex offenders and their transition to the community?
  2. If so, do the policies or procedures include research–based, juvenile sex offender–specific risk assessment tools?
  3. Do policies or procedures require those who are responsible for release decisions to consider the following:
    • Current results from research–supported juvenile sex offender–specific risk assessments?
    • Participation in treatment?
    • Treatment refusals?
    • Ongoing programming needs?
    • Family needs and concerns?
    • Proposed release plans?
    • Other?
  4. In practice, do those responsible for making release decisions receive the following information in a timely manner:
    • Current results from research–supported juvenile sex offender–specific risk assessments?
    • Participation in treatment?
    • Treatment refusals?
    • Ongoing programming needs?
    • Family needs and concerns?
    • Proposed release plans?
    • Other?
  5. In practice, are decisions to release juvenile sex offenders based upon:
    • Current results from research–supported juvenile sex offender–specific risk assessments?
    • Participation in treatment?
    • Treatment refusals?
    • Ongoing programming needs?
    • Family needs and concerns?
    • Proposed release plans?
    • Other?
  6. Is there a formal review process for juvenile sex offenders who are in residential/institutional facilities to prevent excessive lengths of stays?
  7. Do release decisionmakers impose specialized release conditions for juvenile sex offenders?
  8. Do release decisionmakers receive specialized training about juvenile sex offenders and the efficacy of management strategies?
  9. Do case managers collaborate with facility staff to monitor progress and to engage in informed and collaborative decisionmaking about juvenile sex offense cases, including release decisionmaking?
  10. When there are disagreements between case managers and facility staff about the timing of a juvenile sex offender’s release, is an objective case review conducted by a neutral party?

Victim–Centeredness during Release Decisionmaking

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies require notification to victims when juvenile sex offenders’ release proceedings are scheduled?
  2. In practice, are interested victims notified when juvenile sex offenders’ release proceedings are scheduled?
  3. If victims do not want to be notified about release proceedings or release decisions, can they “opt out” of the process?
  4. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies provide for victim input at release proceedings through the following methods:
    • In–person testimony?
    • Via written statements?
    • Through victim advocates?
    • Other?
  5. In practice, are active attempts made to ensure that the release decisionmaking process is victim–centered, including:
    • Conducting release proceedings at times and in locations that are convenient for victims?
    • Appointing victims or victim advocates to serve as release decisionmakers?
    • Other?
  6. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies require notification of interested victims when juvenile sex offenders are released from residential/institutional facilities?
  7. In practice, are interested victims notified when juvenile sex offenders are released from residential/institutional facilities?
  8. Are interested victims provided assistance with the development of safety plans prior to the release of juvenile sex offenders?
  9. Prior to the release of juvenile sex offenders, are no–contact orders in place when warranted?
  10. Do victims’ rights statutes or other policies require release decisionmakers to address victim restitution as a part of release conditions for juvenile sex offenders?
  11. In practice, do release decisionmakers ensure that restitution orders are fulfilled prior to release or as a condition of post–release supervision?
  12. If a victim is present in a school where a juvenile sex offender is anticipated to return, is the juvenile expected/required to find an alternative educational setting?
  13. If a victim is enrolled in the school where a juvenile sex offender is anticipated to return, is the victim or the parent of the victim notified prior to the juvenile’s return?
  14. If a victim is present in a school where a juvenile sex offender is anticipated to return, is a safety plan developed to ensure victim safety and protection?