Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Utilize the Formal Transition Phase to Ensure Continuity of Care

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Is a designated institutional caseworker who is familiar with the specifics of sex offenders’ histories responsible for the transition phase?
  2. Does the caseworker who is responsible for the release plan involve key stakeholders both within and outside of the facility in the transition phase (e.g., medical/mental health professionals, educators, prison–based treatment providers, community supervision officers)?
  3. Are sex offenders actively involved in the release planning process?
  4. Are sex offenders required to participate in community–based sex offender treatment as a condition of release?
  5. Do institutional caseworkers or treatment providers assist with linking sex offenders to community–based sex offender treatment programs prior to release?
  6. When community–based sex offender treatment providers are identified, do sex offenders receive assistance with scheduling initial appointments prior to release?
  7. Do the prison– and community–based sex offender programs operate using a common and complementary treatment model?
  8. Do community–based sex offender treatment providers receive prison–based treatment summaries when offenders return to the community?
  9. For sex offenders who participated in prison–based sex offender treatment, do community–based treatment plans build upon the services received and progress already made?
  10. Prior to sex offenders’ release, are referrals made to community providers to address the following needs, if they are identified:
    • Mental health?
    • Healthcare?
    • Substance abuse?
    • Marital/family?
    • Education/vocation?
    • Other?
  11. Are comprehensive and up–to–date resource inventories available to assist the offenders, their families, and justice professionals with identifying programs and services in local communities?
  12. Are funding mechanisms available to facilitate sex offenders’ access to needed programs and services in the community when they have limited or insufficient resources?

Discharge Summary

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do correctional policies or procedures require the development of a discharge summaries for all sex offenders who are transitioning back to the community?
  2. In practice, are discharge summaries prepared?
  3. Do discharge summaries include the following:
    • Overall adjustment within the institution or facility?
    • Participation in treatment and other programs and services, or refusals?
    • Ongoing and anticipated needs?
    • Current level of risk?
    • Final release plan, which addresses residence/placement, school or employment (as applicable), registration requirements, and special conditions?
  4. Are discharge summaries placed in the files of sex offenders?
  5. Are discharge summaries provided to key stakeholders (e.g., community treatment providers, supervision officers) involved in the reentry process and community management?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Utilize the Formal Transition Phase to Ensure Continuity of Care

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are designated case managers who are familiar with the specifics of juvenile sex offenders’ histories and family circumstances responsible for the transition phase?
  2. Do case managers who are responsible for release planning involve key stakeholders both within and outside of facilities in the transition phase (e.g., medical/mental health professionals, facility educators, community supervision officers, family members)?
  3. Are juvenile sex offenders and their families actively involved in the release planning process?

Continuity of Care: Programs and Services

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are juvenile sex offenders required to participate in community–based sex offender treatment as a condition of release?
  2. Do case managers assist with linking juvenile sex offenders (and their families, as necessary) to the following community–based resources prior to release when these needs are identified:
    • Mental health services?
    • Health care?
    • Mentoring programs?
    • Family–based interventions?
    • Juvenile sex offense–specific treatment?
    • Substance abuse treatment?
    • Employment services?
    • Independent living?
    • Other?
  3. When community–based sex offender treatment is warranted, do juveniles and their families receive assistance with identifying appropriate providers?
  4. When community–based sex offender treatment is warranted, do juveniles and their families receive assistance with scheduling initial appointments with those treatment providers prior to release?
  5. Do community–based sex offender programs for juveniles operate using a common and complementary treatment model?
  6. Do community–based juvenile sex offender treatment providers receive the facility–based treatment summaries when juveniles return to the community?
  7. For juveniles who participated in facility–based/residential sex offender treatment, do community–based treatment plans build upon the services received and progress already made?
  8. Are comprehensive and up–to–date resource directories available to assist the juveniles, their families, and other professionals with identifying programs and services in local communities?
  9. Are funding mechanisms available to facilitate access to needed programs and services in the community when youth or their families have limited or insufficient resources?

Continuity of Care: Education

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are transitional educational plans developed prior to juveniles’ release from institutional custody or residential placement?
  2. Do facility case managers/education staff work closely with the receiving schools in juveniles’ communities to ensure that earned credits from education programs in facilities are transferred to community schools?
  3. Prior to release, do juveniles and their parents, case managers, and other relevant parties (e.g., facility educators, community supervision officers) work closely with the receiving schools in the community to facilitate reenrollments?
  4. Does legislation or school board policy prohibit the return of juvenile sex offenders to public schools?
  5. Are alternative educational settings available to juvenile sex offenders who are prohibited from returning to public schools?
  6. In the event that juveniles are prohibited from returning to schools in the community because of the nature of their offenses, are alternate educational plans (e.g., day treatment, alternative schools, GED) put into place prior to release?
  7. Do community notification requirements mandate notification to local schools when juvenile sex offenders return to communities?
  8. If notification to schools is required, is the information shared only with key school staff members on a “need to know” basis?

Discharge Summary

  1. Do juvenile justice policies or procedures require the development of a discharge summaries for all juvenile sex offenders who are transitioning back to the community?
  2. In practice, are discharge summaries prepared?
  3. Do discharge summaries include the following:
    • Overall adjustment within the facility?
    • Participation in treatment and educational services, or refusals?
    • Ongoing and anticipated needs?
    • Current level of risk?
    • Final release plan, which addresses residence/placement, school or employment (as applicable), registration requirements, and special conditions?
  4. Are discharge summaries placed in juvenile sex offenders’ files?
  5. Are discharge reports provided to key stakeholders (e.g., community treatment providers, supervision officers) involved in the reentry process and community management?