Questions: Adult Sex Offenders

Sex Offender Registration

Clear Policies and Procedures

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do statutes or policies guide the sex offender registration process with respect to the following?
    • Persons subject to registration requirements?
    • Timeframe offender has to comply with registration requirements?
    • Where offender must register?
    • Requirement of offenders to verify/update registration in person on a routine bases (e.g., every 6 months, annually)?
    • Duration of registration period?
  2. Which of the following agencies assumes a role in the sex offender registration process?
    • Sentencing court?
    • Local law enforcement (e.g., police, sheriff’s department)?
    • Statewide law enforcement (e.g., highway patrol, public safety)?
    • Community corrections?
    • Community supervision?
    • Institutional corrections?
  3. Where is the local registry information maintained?
    • Local law enforcement (e.g., police, sheriff’s department)?
    • Statewide law enforcement (e.g., highway patrol, public safety)?
    • Community corrections/supervision agency?
  4. Do statutes or policies specify the time period by which local registries must forward offender data to the state registry?
  5. In practice, is information from local registries forwarded in a timely manner to the state registry?
  6. Where is the central, statewide registry information maintained?
    • Statewide law enforcement (e.g., highway patrol, public safety)?
    • Community corrections/supervision agency?
    • Department of Corrections?
    • Office of the Attorney General?
    • Administrative Office of the Courts/Courts Administrator?
    • Other?
  7. Do statutes or policies specify the time period in which the state registry must forward offender data to the federal registry (National Sex Offender Registry)?
  8. In practice, is the information from state registries forwarded to the federal registry (National Sex Offender Registry) in a timely manner?
  9. Is training provided to personnel involved in the registration process in order to ensure consistency and accuracy?
  10. Do statutes or policies require correctional agencies to notify sex offenders of applicable sex offender registration requirements prior to their release from institutional custody?
  11. In practice, prior to release from institutional custody, are sex offenders notified of sex offender registration requirements?
  12. Do personnel within correctional institutions formally document (e.g., through a standard notice of registration form) when sex offenders are provided notice of sex offender registration requirements?
  13. Do policies or procedures require sex offenders to complete their registration prior to release from institutional custody?
  14. In practice, do sex offenders complete their registration prior to release from institutional custody?
  15. Do policies or procedures require sex offenders to comply with registration requirements within a specified period of time following release from institutional custody?
  16. Do policies or statutes provide for termination or exemption from registration requirements? Please describe circumstances:
  17. Is vigilantism or other misuse of registry information expressly prohibited (e.g., through a statement on sex offender registry Web site or other materials)?

Current and Accurate Registry Information

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do statutes outline penalties for misuse of registry information?

    If so, please list:
  2. Do statutes or policies require agencies to conduct routine verification of the accuracy of information contained within sex offender registries (e.g., every 6 months, annually)?
  3. In practice, is the accuracy of information contained within sex offender registries verified within the established timeframes?
  4. Which agency/agencies are responsible for verifying registry information?
    • Local law enforcement (e.g., police, sheriff’s department)?
    • Statewide law enforcement (e.g., highway patrol, public safety)?
    • Community supervision?
    • Others:
  5. Do interagency agreements (e.g., between supervision and law enforcement) allow partnerships to promote efficiency of verifications?
  6. Do statutes or policies require agency personnel to conduct in–person registry verifications (e.g., door–to–door)?
  7. In practice, do agency personnel conduct in–person registry verifications (e.g., door–to–door)?
  8. Do policies or procedures require supervision officers to verify that sex offenders under supervision have completed the registration process within the established parameters?
  9. In practice, do supervision officers conduct sex offender registry verification for sex offenders under supervision?
  10. Does the agency responsible for registration maintain statistics on the accuracy of registry information?

    If so, which agency?
  11. Does an agency maintain statistics on offender non–compliance with registration requirements?

    If so, which agency?
  12. When sex offenders fail to register, are the following sanctions used?
    • Probation/parole violations?
    • Probation/parole revocations?
    • Civil penalties?
    • Misdemeanor penalties?
    • Felony penalties?
  13. If sex offenders provide false information when registering, are the following sanctions used?
    • Probation/parole violations?
    • Probation/parole revocations?
    • Civil penalties?
    • Misdemeanor penalties?
    • Felony penalties?
    • Community Notification
  14. Do statues or policies require “active” community notification for sex offenders?
  15. In practice, are “active” notifications conducted?
  16. Are the following strategies used for active community notifications?
    • Community meetings?
    • Posted fliers?
    • Newspaper?
    • Door–to–door contacts?
    • Other:
  17. Does the responsible agency maintain statistics on the number and types of active community notifications?

    If so, which agency?
  18. Were active community notification policies and procedures developed by a multidisciplinary collaborative team?

    If yes, were the following involved in developing the policies?
    • Law enforcement officials?
    • Prosecutors?
    • Statewide public safety agency representatives?
    • Supervision officers?
    • Treatment providers?
    • Victim advocates?
    • Others:

Applicability of Notification

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do statutes or policies require “tiers” or “levels” for the purpose of risk–based community notification?

    If so, what establishes the various tier or level (e.g., certain crime categories, assessed level of risk)?
  2. Are the results of an empirically–validated, sex offender–specific risk assessment tool (e.g., RRASOR, STATIC–99) used to inform the risk designation for community notification?

    If so, which tool is used?
  3. Do notification strategies differ based on the sex offenders’ “tier” or “level” classification?
  4. Who is responsible for assigning offenders to the tier or level classification?
    • Sentencing court?
    • Corrections agency?
    • Statewide public safety agency?
    • Community supervision agency?
    • Local law enforcement?
    • Multidisciplinary team (list membership):
  5. Can sex offenders be “re–classified” over time?

    If reclassification processes exist:
    • How often are reclassifications conducted?
    • Do the actual notification practices change as a result of reclassification?
    • Do provisions allow sex offenders to request reclassification?
    • If so, are offenders notified of their ability to request reclassification?
    • How often do offenders request reclassification?

Community Education to Enhance Community Notification

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do policies or procedures outline a formal protocol for conducting community meetings for the purposes of notification?
  2. In practice, how often is the protocol used?
  3. Do multidisciplinary teams conduct community meeting notifications?

    If so, are the following professionals involved?
    • Law enforcement officials?
    • Prosecutors?
    • Statewide public safety agency representatives?
    • Community supervision officers?
    • Treatment providers?
    • Victim advocates?
    • Others:
  4. Is “general” information about sexual victimization, sex offenders, and management strategies discussed during community notification meetings (e.g., overview of national trends and practices)?

    If so, are the following discussed?
    • Information about sexual victimization?
    • Information about sex offenders (e.g., common myths, statistics)?
    • Prevention and safety information?
    • Description of local sex offender management efforts?
    • Available resources for victims?
    • Who to contact for additional information?
    • How to access registries?
    • Prohibitions about vigilantism and other misuses of registry and notification information?
  5. Are printed materials distributed during community notification meetings?

    If so, how often are the following included:
    • Information about sexual victimization?
    • Fact sheets about sex offenders (e.g., common myths, statistics)?
    • Prevention and safety information?
    • Description of local sex offender management efforts?
    • Contact information for agencies if more information is desired?
    • Resources for victims?
    • Information about sex offender registries, including statements prohibiting misuses?
    • Other:
  6. Is there a debriefing opportunity (or similar process) to evaluate the impact or effectiveness of the community meeting?
  7. Are the families of sex offenders informed of notification requirements?
  8. Are employers informed about sex offenders’ impending notifications?
  9. Are landlords or roommates of sex offenders informed about impending notifications?
  10. Are communities made aware of local victim advocacy organizations and how they can be of assistance?
  11. Are community members provided the opportunity to voice their concerns and ask questions about sex offenders in their community?

Other Key Questions to Consider

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are sex offenders and their family members (if applicable) prepared to manage the potential negative reactions of community members that may result from the notification process?
  2. Are active steps taken to ensure that the identities of victims of sex offenders are protected during the notification process?
  3. When considering registration and/or notification legislation, do legislators and other policymakers receive specialized information about contemporary research and practice about sex offenders, victims, and effective management strategies?
  4. Does registration/notification legislation or do other agency policies include requirements for research and evaluation of the impact of these laws in the state?
  5. Is funding dedicated specifically to research and evaluation efforts about the impact of registration/notification laws in the state?

Questions: Juvenile Sex Offenders

Sex Offender Registration

Clear Policies and Procedures

  1. Does a statute require juvenile sex offenders to register?

    (If juvenile sex offenders are not required to register, skip the remainder of the questions in this subsection.)
  2. Does the statute restrict the type of sex offenses for which juveniles are required to register?

    Please list restrictions/exclusions:
  3. Does the statute specify a minimum age for applicability for juvenile sex offenders?

    If so, what is the minimum age of applicability?
  4. Are registration requirements applicable only to juveniles whose cases are transferred to the adult criminal justice system?
  5. Do policies or procedures specifically guide the registration process for juveniles?
  6. Which of the following agencies assumes a role in the juvenile sex offender registration process?
    • Juvenile/family court?
    • Adult/criminal court?
    • Juvenile justice agency?
    • Juvenile probation/parole agency?
    • Statewide law enforcement (e.g., highway patrol, public safety)?
    • Adult corrections agency?
    • Adult supervision agency?
  7. Are parents or guardians of juvenile sex offenders informed of registration requirements?
  8. Where is the registry data about juveniles maintained?
    • Central statewide registry?
    • Juvenile/family court?
    • Juvenile justice agency?
    • Local law enforcement (e.g., police, sheriff’s department)?
    • Others?
  9. Do policies or procedures specify the time period in which local registries must forward registry data about juveniles to the state registry?
  10. In practice, is juvenile data from local registries forwarded in a timely manner to the state registry?
  11. Is training provided to individuals involved in the juvenile sex offender registration process in order to ensure consistency and accuracy?
  12. Do policies or procedures require staff in residential or institutional facilities to notify juvenile sex offenders and their parents/guardians of applicable registration requirements prior to release?
  13. In practice, are juveniles and their parents/guardians notified of applicable registration requirements prior to the juveniles’ release from residential or institutional placement?
  14. Do policies or procedures require juvenile sex offenders and their parents/guardians to complete the registration process prior to the juveniles’ release from residential or institutional placement?
  15. In practice, do juvenile sex offenders fulfill registration requirements prior to or upon release from residential or institutional placement?
  16. Do residential or institutional staff members (e.g., case managers) and/or community–based stakeholders (e.g., supervision officers) assist juvenile sex offenders with fulfilling their registration requirements prior to release?
  17. Do statutes or policies provide for relief from registration requirements for juvenile sex offenders?

    If so, describe the circumstances:
  18. If so, are these relief mechanisms used?
  19. Does the statute provide for automatic termination of juvenile sex offenders’ requirements to register (e.g., based on prescribed duration of registration responsibilities, maximum age applicability)?
  20. Is there a specified age at which registration requirements are automatically terminated for juvenile sex offenders? If so, what is the age?
  21. Does the statute allow juveniles and their parents/guardians the opportunity to petition the courts for relief from registration requirements?
  22. If so, are juveniles and their parents/guardians aware that they can petition the courts for relief from registration requirements?
  23. Do juveniles and their parents/guardians petition the courts for relief from registration requirements?
  24. Do statutes or policies provide for the expunction of juvenile sex offender registry records under specified circumstances? If so, please describe the circumstances:
  25. Do statutes or policies outline penalties for the misuse of information contained in the juvenile sex offender registry?

Current and Accurate Information

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do statutes or policies require community supervision officers, case managers, or others to verify that juvenile sex offenders have completed the registration process within the established parameters or time–frames?
  2. In practice, do community supervision officers, case managers, or others verify that juvenile sex offenders have completed the registration process within established parameters or timeframes?
  3. Do statutes or policies require routine verification (e.g., yearly) of the accuracy of registry data about juvenile sex offenders?
  4. In practice, is the accuracy of registry data about juvenile sex offenders verified routinely (e.g., yearly)?
  5. Do statutes or policies require in–person registry verifications to be conducted for juvenile sex offenders?
  6. In practice, are in–person registry verifications conducted for juvenile sex offenders?
  7. Is funding available to support efforts to verify registry data about juvenile sex offenders?
  8. Do interagency agreements (e.g., between supervision, law enforcement, juvenile courts) allow partnerships to promote efficiency in the registry verification process with juvenile sex offenders?
  9. Are statistics maintained on the accuracy of registry information with juvenile sex offenders?

    If so, which agency or agencies maintain them?
  10. Are statistics maintained on juvenile sex offender non–compliance with registration requirements?
  11. When juvenile sex offenders fail to register or when they provide false information for the registry, which of the following sanctions are available?
    • Probation/parole violation?
    • Probation/parole revocation?
    • Additional petitions or charges in the juvenile justice system?
    • Charges in the criminal justice system?
    • Community Notification
  12. Can information about juvenile sex offenders be released to certain parties (e.g., schools, law enforcement) on a “need to know” basis, regard less of whether registration or notification statutes exist?
  13. Is registry information about juvenile sex offenders publicly accessible?
  14. If not publicly accessible, is registry information about juvenile sex offenders accessible to limited parties on a “need to know” basis (e.g., law enforcement, schools, daycare providers)?

    (If no, skip the remainder of the questions in this subsection.)
  15. Are juvenile sex offenders and their parents/guardians informed of applicable notification requirements?
  16. Is the application of notification laws restricted only to juvenile sex offenders who are assessed to pose a high risk to reoffend?
  17. Is notification restricted to juvenile sex offenders who are over a specific age?

    If so, what is the minimum age of applicability?
  18. Do statutes or policies include other restrictions or exemptions regarding which juvenile sex offenders are subject to community notification?

    If so, list these restrictions or exemptions:
  19. Do statutes or policies specifically guide the community notification process for juvenile sex offenders?
  20. Are those involved in the community notification process with juvenile sex offenders trained in the administration of applicable statutes, policies, or procedures?

Applicability of Notification

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Do statutes or policies require juvenile sex offenders to be classified into risk “levels” or “tiers” for the purpose of risk–based community notification?

    If so, what establishes the tiers or levels (e.g., certain crime categories, assessed level of risk)?
  2. Are results of promising, research–supported, juvenile sex offender–specific assessment tools used to inform the classification process?
  3. In practice, are juvenile sex offenders classified into risk levels for the purpose of community notification?
  4. Who is responsible for assigning juvenile sex offenders to the tier or level classification?
    • Juvenile/family court?
    • Juvenile justice/corrections agency?
    • Statewide public safety agency?
    • Community supervision agency?
    • Local law enforcement?
    • Multi–disciplinary team (list membership):
  5. Do notification strategies differ based on juvenile sex offenders’ tier or risk level classification?
  6. Can juvenile sex offenders be “re–classified” over time?

    If re–classification processes exist:
    • How often are re–classifications conducted?
    • Do the actual notification practices change as a result of re–classification?
    • Do provisions allow for juvenile sex offenders and their parents/ guardians to petition the courts for re–classification?
    • Are juvenile sex offenders and their parents/guardians notified of their ability to petition the courts for re–classification?
  7. Do juvenile sex offenders and their parents/guardians request re–classification?

Community Education to Enhance Community Notification

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are victim advocates involved in the development and implementation of policies related to community notification for juvenile sex offenders?
  2. Are community members provided specific education about juvenile offending, juvenile sex offender management, and the differences between these youth and their adult counterparts?

Other Key Questions to Consider

Always/ Yes Typically Generally Not Never/ No
  1. Are juvenile sex offenders and their parents/guardians given assistance to prepare for the potential negative community reactions that may result from the notification process?
  2. Are sex offenders and their family members (if applicable) prepared to manage the potential negative reactions of community members that may result from the notification process?
  3. Are active steps taken to ensure that the identities of victims of juvenile sex offenders are protected during the notification process?
  4. When considering the application of registration and/or notification legislation to juveniles, do legislators and other policymakers receive specialized information about contemporary research and practice about juvenile sex offenders, victims, and effective management strategies?
  5. Is funding dedicated specifically to research and evaluation efforts about the impact of juvenile registration/notification laws in the state?